Jebel Ali remains premier gateway to GCC

Updated 18 December 2012
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Jebel Ali remains premier gateway to GCC

Jebel Ali Port has handled more than 500,000 vehicles in less than 12 months, DP World said in a statement yesterday. This translates into almost one vehicle imported, exported or re-exported every minute of the day, 24x7. Achieved in the first 49 weeks of this year, the record exceeds the peak levels of 2008 when the number of vehicles handled through the port for the full year was 479,000.
“DP World is proud that our flagship Jebel Ali Port continues to play its full role as the premier gateway to the GCC region. The record number of vehicles that have passed through the port’s facility for roll-on roll-off (Ro-Ro) vehicle carriers reinforces the growth message for the UAE and the wider region that we are hearing from economic commentators such as the IMF,” said Mohammed Al Muallem, senior vice president and managing director, DP World, UAE region.
General Cargo facilities at Jebel Ali include 30 berths and a total storage area of over 1.3 million square meters, comprising 1.2 million square metres of open storage and 100,000 square meters of covered space.
"By handling over half a million vehicles in less than a full calendar year, our Ro-Ro terminal has once again proved its world class capabilities and the importance DP World UAE Region continues to give to general cargo throughput alongside our container handling business,” said Tariq Bin Khalifa, director general cargo, DP World, UAE region.


Harley-Davidson to move some production out of US to avoid EU tariffs

Updated 13 min 45 sec ago
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Harley-Davidson to move some production out of US to avoid EU tariffs

  • The shift in production is an unintended consequence of Trump’s administration imposing tariffs on European steel and aluminum
  • In response to US tariffs, the EU began charging import duties of 25 percent on a range of US products

Harley-Davidson Inc. said on Monday it would move production of motorcycles shipped to the European Union from the United States to its international facilities and forecast the trading bloc’s retaliatory tariffs would cost the company $90 million to $100 million a year.
The shift in production is an unintended consequence of US President Donald Trump’s administration imposing tariffs on European steel and aluminum early this month, a move designed to protect US jobs.
In response to the US tariffs, the European Union began charging import duties of 25 percent on a range of US products including big motorcycles like Harley’s on June 22.
In a regulatory filing https://bit.ly/2tA1ru0 on Monday, the Milwaukee, Wisconsin-based company said the retaliatory duties would result in an incremental cost of about $2,200 per average motorcycle exported from the United States to the European Union, but it would not raise retail or wholesale prices for its dealers to cover the costs of the tariffs.
The company expects the tariffs to result in incremental costs of $30 million to $45 million for the rest of 2018, the filing said.
“Harley-Davidson believes the tremendous cost increase, if passed onto its dealers and retail customers, would have an immediate and lasting detrimental impact to its business in the region,” the company said.
Struggling to overcome a slump in US demand, Harley has been aiming to boost sales of its iconic motorcycles overseas to 50 percent of total annual volume from about 43 percent currently.
In January, the company announced the closure of a plant in Kansas City, Missouri as part of a consolidation plan after its motorcycle shipments fell to their lowest level in six years.
In 2017, Harley sold nearly 40,000 new motorcycles in Europe which accounted for more than 16 percent of the company’s sales last year. The revenues from EU countries were second only to the United States.
Harley said ramping-up production at its overseas international plants will require incremental investments and could take at least nine to 18 months.
The company will provide more details of the financial implications of retaliatory EU tariffs and plans to offset their impact on July 24 when its second-quarter earnings are due, the filing said.
Trump vowed to make the iconic motorcycle maker great again when he took office last year.
In late April, Harley said Trump’s metal tariffs would inflate its costs by an additional $15 million to $20 million this year on top of already rising raw material prices that it expected at the start of the year.