Jebel Ali remains premier gateway to GCC

Updated 18 December 2012
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Jebel Ali remains premier gateway to GCC

Jebel Ali Port has handled more than 500,000 vehicles in less than 12 months, DP World said in a statement yesterday. This translates into almost one vehicle imported, exported or re-exported every minute of the day, 24x7. Achieved in the first 49 weeks of this year, the record exceeds the peak levels of 2008 when the number of vehicles handled through the port for the full year was 479,000.
“DP World is proud that our flagship Jebel Ali Port continues to play its full role as the premier gateway to the GCC region. The record number of vehicles that have passed through the port’s facility for roll-on roll-off (Ro-Ro) vehicle carriers reinforces the growth message for the UAE and the wider region that we are hearing from economic commentators such as the IMF,” said Mohammed Al Muallem, senior vice president and managing director, DP World, UAE region.
General Cargo facilities at Jebel Ali include 30 berths and a total storage area of over 1.3 million square meters, comprising 1.2 million square metres of open storage and 100,000 square meters of covered space.
"By handling over half a million vehicles in less than a full calendar year, our Ro-Ro terminal has once again proved its world class capabilities and the importance DP World UAE Region continues to give to general cargo throughput alongside our container handling business,” said Tariq Bin Khalifa, director general cargo, DP World, UAE region.


Israel’s tech sector faces challenge from shortage of workers

Updated 16 December 2018
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Israel’s tech sector faces challenge from shortage of workers

  • The sector accounts for about 45 percent of Israel’s exports
  • Arabs account for only 3 percent of tech workers but this is expected to change soon as 18 percent of all computer science students today are Arab

TEL AVIV: Israel is struggling to recruit enough workers to its technology sector, a report showed on Sunday, creating a challenge for an industry seen as the country’s main potential driver of economic growth over the next decade.
Start-Up Nation Central, which published the report with the Israel Innovation Authority, said that while the number of high-tech workers in Israel had grown over the past five years, their percentage of the labor force remained unchanged.
“It is becoming increasingly clear that the required growth will not be possible if the country’s supply of tech workers is inadequate,” said Eugene Kandel, head of Start-Up Nation Central
“Tech companies are struggling to find tech professionals, with many already finding (them) overseas.”
The number of tech workers — who earn more than double the average wage — grew to 280,000 in 2017 from 240,000 in 2013 but represent only 8 percent of the workforce, down from nearly 10 percent in 2008.
This is surprising given that investment into high-tech has soared, with venture capital funding exceeding $5 billion in 2017 and closing in on $6.5 billion this year. The number of multinationals operating development centers in Israel jumped to nearly 350 in 2016 from around 50 in 2000.
The sector accounts for about 45 percent of Israel’s exports. But about 15,300 positions remain open.
To find workers, Israeli companies are opening development centers overseas, mainly in Ukraine but also in the United States, Russia and India. Several dozen firms have also taken advantage of a rapid process established by the government in 2018 to obtain special visas for foreign tech workers.
But in the long term more initiatives are needed to increase the pool of workers, Kandel told reporters. There is great potential among women, who represent only 23 percent of tech workers, as well the largely untapped Arab and ultra-Orthodox Jewish sectors.
Arabs account for only 3 percent of tech workers but this is expected to change soon as 18 percent of all computer science students today are Arab, similar to their share of the population.
One obstacle for their employment in high-tech is that they live far from the country’s center.
Aharon Aharon, head of the government’s Innovation Authority, said he would launch two plans in the first quarter of 2019 — one to provide incentives in building an innovation ecosystem in the periphery and another to encourage tech companies to open branches outside of the center.