Jeddah a legendary city, says Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled

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Updated 20 December 2012
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Jeddah a legendary city, says Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled

Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled Al-Faisal inaugurated the new corniche project in the north of Jeddah late Tuesday. Minister of Municipal and Rural Affairs Prince Mansour bin Miteb and other dignitaries attended the ceremony.
“Following this project will be one that will extend from the north of Al-Nawras Square with the length of 9 km,” said Jeddah Mayor Hani Abu Ras, adding that designs and sketches are already done.
The mayor explained that his office made sure that the project is implemented in stages so that the whole seafront would not be invisible to residents and visitors.
The newly renovated corniche area stretches from the Border Guards headquarters in the south to Al-Nawras Square — a distance of 4 km. It covers an area of more than 320,000 sq. meters that include playgrounds for children, parking lots, green spaces and a pedestrian lane, as well as aesthetic sites and fountains on the beach.
The mayor pointed out that a complete infrastructure was provided, as well as Internet coverage and an integrated audio system, stressing at the same time that the implementation of the project took into consideration the appropriate facilities for people with special needs.
Prince Khaled highlighted the tremendous progress achieved by Jeddah despite the negligence of some officials. “It’s a legendary city that spreads happiness among its residents,” he said.
He thanked Municipal and Rural Affairs Minister Prince Mansour bin Miteb and the mayor for implementing the project that would help Jeddah families enjoy their evenings and weekends in a better way.
Speaking at the ceremony, Prince Mansour said the government had implemented a large number of projects in the city in recent years including new overpasses and underpasses at a cost of more than SR 2.5 billion. “It includes nine cleaning contracts and a large marine recreation facility,” the minister said.
Prince Khaled and other dignitaries later watched a documentary on Jeddah’s progress over the past years.
Implemented by the Jeddah mayoralty, the project won the Big Project Middle East Award this year. Jeddah is the first city in the Kingdom to receive the Big Project ME award.
The award was presented by Raz Islam, publishing director of CPI, and was accepted by Mayor Aburas during a colorful ceremony in Dubai.
The Big Project Middle East Award is the official award given by Big Project Middle East Magazine, which recognizes companies and individuals that have contributed to both the construction and sustainability industries across the GCC. Big Project Middle East is published by CPI, one of the region’s largest publishers.
Commenting on the award, Aburas said: “On behalf of the residents of Jeddah, we are delighted to receive this award with the recent inauguration of this substantial waterfront project whereby 4.5 km were completed out of 13 km of waterfront. This project is very important for the city of Jeddah, since it is a coastal city. The waterfront is now a destination and a landmark for Jeddah residents and visitors.” The mayor added: “Our team is an innovative, solution-oriented group of experts in the areas of civil engineering who were dedicated to this project’s success.”
Aburas said his organization considered the award as a big honor. “We seek solutions that fit and best serve the needs of Jeddah residents and visitors. Accepting this recognition in Civil Development from Big Project Middle East is a true honor.”


Saudi Arabia taking lead in interfaith dialogue

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman says he wants to return Saudi Arabia to a ‘moderate Islam’ that is more open and tolerant of other faiths. (SPA)
Updated 47 min ago
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Saudi Arabia taking lead in interfaith dialogue

  • The crown prince stressed the importance of respect between followers of all religions and the need to promote the positive values of coexistence and tolerance

JEDDAH: In 2007, King Abdullah held a groundbreaking meeting with Pope Benedict XVI. A year later, he invited religious scholars, media representatives, academics and intellectuals from around the globe to take part in three-day interfaith talks in Makkah. During that meeting, the parameters of the discussions Muslims should be having with people of other faiths were outlined. Since then, Saudi Arabia’s efforts to bring peace to the world have not stopped, nor will they end till the globe is free of terrorism and extremism. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has said in interviews that he wants to return Saudi Arabia to a “moderate Islam” that is more open to the world and tolerant of other faiths. In November 2017, King Salman held talks in Riyadh with Lebanon’s Maronite Christian Patriarch Bechara Boutros Al-Rahi.
Both men stressed the importance of the role of all religions and cultures in promoting tolerance, renouncing violence, extremism and terrorism, and achieving security and peace for the peoples of the region and the world. Al-Rahi later also met the crown prince.
In April this year, the king received at his office at Al-Yamamah Palace in Riyadh the chairman of the Pontifical Council for Interfaith Dialogue at the Vatican, Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, and his accompanying delegation.
During the meeting, they again stressed the important role that followers of all religions and cultures have to play in renouncing violence, extremism and terrorism, and achieving global security and stability. In March, Crown Prince Mohammed met political and religious leaders on the second day of his landmark visit to the UK. Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, the spiritual leader of the Anglican Communion of millions of Christians, received the crown prince at Lambeth Palace in central London, where the two men talked for an hour.
They also viewed a selection of early texts from the Christian, Muslim and Jewish faiths, including fragments of a Qur’an manuscript found in a Birmingham University library in 2015, which are thought to be among the world’s oldest.
The crown prince extended an invitation to the archbishop to visit Saudi Arabia, according to senior sources at the Saudi Embassy in the UK and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. They added that the meeting had been “very positive and very pleasant.” Three weeks later, the crown prince met several US religious leaders in New York.
During those meetings, the crown prince stressed the importance of respect between followers of all religions and the need to promote the positive values of coexistence and tolerance. A few days before his trip to the UK, the crown prince met Coptic Pope Tawadros II at Cairo’s largest cathedral, and invited Egyptian Christians to visit Saudi Arabia, saying that all Coptic Christians are welcome.
Meanwhile, the secretary-general of the Muslim World League, Mohammed bin Abdul Karim Al-Issa, and the Vatican’s Cardinal Tauran signed a cooperation agreement in April for achieving common objectives. Islamic researcher Sheikh Ahmed Al-Ghamdi said interfaith dialogue is a necessary human, religious and cultural endeavor that will help to curb terrorism and extremism. A former president of the Makkah branch of the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice — sometimes referred to in the media as the “religious police” — he believes that such discussions should be widened to include more followers of other religions to ease hostilities and thwart terrorism, sectarianism and racism.
“We need to widen the circle of interfaith dialogue between societies in order to spread acquaintance, create rapprochement and correct the distorted image of Islam,” he said.
“Dialogue between followers of all the divinely revealed religions — Judaism, Christianity and Islam — can bring peace to the world. Moreover, talking with followers of Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism and other religions can also widen the space for peace.