Kane brace powers Blackhawks over Sharks

Updated 07 February 2013
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Kane brace powers Blackhawks over Sharks

SAN JOSE, California: Patrick Kane scored twice, including the tiebreaking goal after a fight midway through the second period as the Chicago Blackhawks beat the San Jose Sharks 5-3 on Tuesday in a matchup of the NHL’s top two teams.
Brandon Saad, Andrew Shaw and Marcus Kruger also scored for the Blackhawks, who overcame a 2-0 deficit to remain the only team yet to lose in regulation this season. Corey Crawford made 30 saves.
Joe Pavelski, Tommy Wingels and Michal Handzus scored for the Sharks, while Antti Niemi made 26 saves.
David Clarkson scored twice and set up New Jersey’s other goal as the Devils downed the New York Rangers 3-1 in their first meeting since last year’s Eastern Conference finals.
The Devils won that series in six games, and they still had the Rangers’ number in getting 24 saves from Martin Brodeur.
Chris Kreider scored for the Rangers, while Henrik Lundqvist had 19 saves.
James Neal gave Pittsburgh to an early lead, and Marc-Andre Fleury and the rest of the Penguins then held on to beat the Islanders.
The New York Islanders stormed back to avoid their second straight home shut out in a 4-2 loss to the Pittsburgh Penguins.
Pittsburgh took a 3-0 lead 1:44 into the third period with Brandon Sutter’s goal, before Michael Grabner sparked a New York comeback at 3:14, and Brad Boyes — moved up to the top line for this game — made it 3-2 just 35 seconds later when he flung a shot past Fleury, who was sprawled on the ice.
Defenseman Simon Despres added a second-period goal for Pittsburgh.
Pascal Dupuis finally put away the Islanders with an empty-net goal with 39 seconds left.
Los Angeles’ Mike Richards scored his first goal of the season and Jonathan Quick stopped 18 shots as the Kings downed the Blue Jackets 4-2.
Anze Kopitar, Jeff Carter and Slava Voynov also scored while Justin Williams had three assists for the reigning Stanley Cup champions, who began the night 14th in the Western Conference with six points — two more than last-place Calgary and one fewer than Columbus.
Derick Brassard and Dereck MacKenzie had the Blue Jackets’ goals.
At Detroit, Jarome Iginla scored his first goal of the season and Dennis Wideman had a goal and an assist to lead the Calgary Flames past the Detroit Red Wings 4-1.
Curtis Glencross and Mark Giordano also scored for Calgary, while Miikka Kiprusoff made 19 saves before being replaced by Leland Irving to start the third period because of a lower-body injury. Irving stopped six shots.
Johan Franzen scored for Detroit and Jimmy Howard made 19 saves.
Philadelphia’s Tom Sestito scored his first two goals in three years to lead the Flyers over the Tampa Bay Lightning 2-1, while Chris Neil scored in the second period and Craig Anderson made 20 saves to lead the Ottawa Senators past the Buffalo Sabres 4-3.
In other games, the Toronto Maple Leafs edged the Washington Capitals 3-2, the Nashville Predators downed the St. Louis Blues 6-1 and the Winnipeg Jets beat the Florida Panthers 3-2 in overtime.


Interview: Turkish NBA star Enes Kanter on standing up to ‘ruthless’ Erdogan

Updated 43 min 8 sec ago
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Interview: Turkish NBA star Enes Kanter on standing up to ‘ruthless’ Erdogan

  • ‘I have an obligation to speak against atrocities,’ basketball star tells Arab News
  • ‘Whatever I am going through in my personal life doesn’t impact my performance on court’

CHICAGO: NBA superstar Enes Kanter says he loves his homeland Turkey as much as he loves professional basketball. 

Yet Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has continuously attacked Kanter, who plays for the Portland Trail Blazers.

Erdogan has arrested Kanter’s father, and bullied his family after accusing the basketball player of being part of the Hizmet movement of exiled Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen, who the president asserts was behind a failed coup attempt in 2016.

Two years ago this week, Erdogan demanded that Kanter be arrested, and fears of violence from the Turkish state have gotten so bad that the FBI installed a panic button to help protect the player.

Kanter said he will continue to play professional basketball, and will not be silent about the Turkish government’s repression.

“His (Erdogan’s) regime’s and his hostility to me began in 2013 when I first start criticizing (the) government on unjust, unfair and illegal closures of college preparatory centers linked to businesspeople in the Hizmet movement,” Kanter said.

 “This closure pretty much became the first public clash between the Erdogan regime and the Hizmet movement,” he added.

“It was obvious that there was something that Erdogan doesn’t like about the Hizmet movement. Up until the closures of college preparatory centers, no one knew about that,” Kanter said.

“The way Erdogan handled this relationship was brutal, ruthless, unjust and unfair. I can’t stand for any of these, so I stood up against this tyranny and started criticizing. Neither Erdogan stopped his approach nor I, and we’ve kept clashing since then.”

Kanter said he will continue to play professional basketball, and will not be silent about the Turkish government’s repression. (AFP)

Kanter played for the Turkish national team at EuroBasket 2011 in Lithuania, and for the Turkish U18 national team in 2009.

He led Turkey to the bronze medal at the European Championships in France, and was named Best Player and Best Center at the 2009 European Championships by Eurobasket.com. 

Kanter signed with the Utah Jazz in 2011, the Oklahoma City Thunder in 2015, the New York Knicks in 2017, and the Portland Trail Blazers in February this year.

The Trail Blazers lost the Western Division Playoffs, the first step to the NBA Championships, to California’s Golden State Warriors in the final game on Monday.

Erdogan’s threats have placed enormous pressure on Kanter, but he insists it has not impacted his performance or his commitment to help the people of Turkey.

“I’m a successful professional athlete, and whatever I’m going through in my private life would never impact my performance on court,” he said.

“They’re two different worlds for me … I’ve known nothing else but basketball … since I was 13, so I guess it’s pretty important,” he added.

“I see basketball and my platform as a way to teach the younger generation how to be successful and hopeful for the future,” Kanter said.

“Once you’re a successful professional athlete, younger generations see you as a role model, so … I’m trying to do my best to set my life as a role model to them,” he added.

“I believe I have an obligation as a human being to speak up against any atrocities. I believe that as a human being I should be standing for human rights, democracy and freedom of speech … Me being a celebrity makes it easier for people to hear, see and experience what I believe.”

I believe I have an obligation as a human being to speak up against any atrocities.

Enes Kanter, Portland Trail Blazers center

On Erdogan, Kanter does not mince words. “He’s a dictator by definition. He silences media, destroys opposition, demonizes his critics … so all these make him a dictator,” Kanter said.

“Turkey deserves a leader who’s open minded, democratic, progressive, intelligent, modest and forward thinking, a leader who embraces everybody in the community regardless of their political choices.”

The harassment from Erdogan has put Kanter’s family at risk too. “I can’t say they’re safe when my dad lost his job and got jailed based on terrorism charges because I’m his son,” Kanter said. “These allegations are baseless and ridiculous, so how could I feel they’re safe?”

He said he respects Gulen and the Hizmet movement, rejecting Erdogan’s claims against them.

“I’m so close to Mr. Fethullah Gulen in terms of his life philosophy and teachings. I admire his way of extracting an individual’s inner potential … in order to be a better person in his or her community,” Kanter said.

“Erdogan should know that he’ll be brought to justice one day and pay for his mistakes. First, he should stop all his unjust, inhumane acts against the people of Turkey. Second, he should start making everybody’s life better in Turkey.”

Before moving to the US in 2009 to attend college in California, Kanter was a star basketball player in Turkey’s premier leagues.

He said despite playing for the NBA in the US, he still sees himself as a champion for Turkey and its people.

“I was Turkey’s best basketball player, and I’m still Turkey’s best basketball player. The only difference is that I’m now representing my country in the US. I left Turkey for a better opportunity in my career, to play in the NBA,” he added.

“I think everyone in society has an obligation to speak out on issues of human rights and democracy, and to stand tall against atrocities, inhumane practices and dictatorships,” Kanter said.

Celebrities like himself “have a bigger opportunity to make a difference and to raise awareness on such issues because of our platforms,” he added.

Erdogan has continuously attacked Kanter, who plays for the Portland Trail Blazers. (AFP)