Khoja lays foundation stone for Gulf Radio, TV Corp

Updated 11 October 2012
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Khoja lays foundation stone for Gulf Radio, TV Corp

RIYADH: Minister of Culture and Information Abdul Aziz Khoja Tuesday laid the foundation stone for the permanent headquarters of the Gulf Radio and Television Corporation in the Diplomatic Quarter in Riyadh.
The ground-breaking ceremony was attended by a number of GCC officials concerned with information affairs, including Head of information affairs in Bahrain Sheikh Fawwaz bin Mohammed Al-Khalifa, Omani Minister of Information Abdulmoneim bin Mansour Al-Hassani, Kuwaiti Minister of Information and State Minister for Cabinet Affairs Sheikh Mohammed Al-Abdullah Al-Mubarak Al-Sabah, Qatari Executive Vice President for information foundation Mubarak Al-Kuwari, GCC Assistant Secretary-General for cultural and information affairs Khalid bin Salim Al-Ghassani, and Saudi Deputy Minister of Culture and Information Abdullah bin Saleh Al-Jasser. Director General of the Gulf Radio and Television (GRTV) Abdullah bin Said Abu Ras addressed the ceremony, saying the event clearly symbolizes the strong-based relations between sons of the GCC countries and represents a model for joint GCC work.
He expressed appreciation to the government of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques for its full-fledged support to the project and allocation of a plot of land, estimated at 4,000 sq. meters, and bearing the cost of the overall project that exceeds SR 15 million.
The built-up area is 2,823 sq. meters and will include a radio and TV training center aimed at training GCC young cadres in addition to an information documentation center, designed to build an electronic data base.
It will also house a TV and radio program exchange center between GCC member states and other support services, Khoja was quoted by the Saudi Press Agency as saying.
Commenting on the event, Saudi Deputy Minister of Culture and Information Al-Jasser said Gulf Radio and TV is one of the Gulf institutions founded upon a decision of the GCC ministers of information, whose board of directors is headed by Culture and Information Minister Khoja.
He said the land of the project had been donated by the government of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques, which would also bear the construction costs of the project.
Last July, the minister of culture and information signed a contract with a national company for the construction of the GRTV’s permanent headquarters. The project will be completed in two years.


Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

Updated 19 July 2019
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Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

  • The president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury Shagaf Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey
  • Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back”

CHRISTCHURCH: King Salman’s Hajj offer to host families of those affected by March’s Christchurch terror attacks is “something really special,” said the president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury, Shagaf Khan.
The Saudi king has offered to host and cover the expenses of 200 Hajj pilgrims when they journey to Makkah this year.
Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey. “For some of them, it’ll be a great comfort feeling like they’ve fulfilled the obligations of being a Muslim,” he added.
Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back.”
When asked what the offer would mean for Canterbury’s Muslim community, Khan said it is part of the solidarity and support that has been shown to them since the Christchurch terror attacks, which claimed the lives of 51 people.
“Four months on … people still feel supported and they feel they’re still being remembered,” he added.
Sheikh Mohammed Amir, who is working closely with the local community, Saudi Arabia’s Embassy and its Ministry of Islamic Affairs to implement King Salman’s offer, said it will be available for those who had lost family members or been injured in the mosque attacks.
Canterbury’s Muslims are “very appreciative” of the offer, added Amir, who is chairman of the Islamic Scholars Board of New Zealand.
“I’ll say with full confidence that this will be a big relief for the deceased’s families, for the victims, for all those who’ve been injured and affected,” he said.
When asked how the organization of the pilgrimage is going, Amir said “so far, so good,” but added that it has been challenging without official records to track everyone down.
He said it is an honor and a responsibility to help organize the pilgrimage, which he has been helping to plan since the end of Ramadan. “People are very excited about it,” he added.
He said he believed that the king’s offer had been made to help people’s rehabilitation after the terror attacks.
“The community believes he’s going to contribute in building Christchurch and bringing people to a normal life,” Amir added.