Kingdom seen as regional water management hub

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Updated 31 December 2012
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Kingdom seen as regional water management hub

Saudi Arabia has the opportunity to become one of the centers of water management in the region and perhaps in the world, according to Olivier Brousse, CEO of SAUR, one of the three leading providers of outsourced services for water authorities in the water and waste management industries in France.
“Expansion through strategic joint venture partnerships in the Kingdom is a clear example of SAUR’s commitment to this region,” he said.
Brousse was in Jeddah to attend the recently concluded Saudi Water & Power Forum & Exhibition (SWPF) 2012.
He also said SAUR began its international development in the 1960s, first in Africa, and then in Europe, Asia and South America. Since 2008, the group’s focus has shifted to consolidating its existing positions in Europe (Poland, Spain, Scotland and Armenia) and boosting its growth in the GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) region, with primary focus on Saudi Arabia.
SAUR, which has various projects in the Kingdom, wants to make Saudi Arabia one of the key strategic countries for the future, said Brousse.
In 2005, he said SAUR was commissioned by the Ministry of Water and Electricity of Saudi Arabia, as part of a group tender, to conduct an audit of the water and sanitation services in parts of the Eastern Province.
Brousse said SAUR carried out a complete technical and financial audit of the water and sanitation services in Dammam (750,000 inhabitants) and in Alkhobar (360,000 inhabitants) in partnership with the Zamil Group.
He said the SAUR-Zamil joint venture won the 5.4 million-euro Quick Wins contract for technical assistance and customer relationship management over a 16-month period.
In August 2009, the SAUR-Zamil joint venture signed a 2.3 million euro Quick Wins contract for technical assistance in Makkah, over a period of one year.
The National Water Company (NWC) awarded the contract for water distribution and network management in the Makkah and Taif to the Franco-Saudi O & M consortium SAUR-Zamil (equity is split 70 percent for SAUR and 30 percent for Zamil) in August 2010.
The five-year management contract covers all services related to water supply and sanitation and customers management.
It includes the management and operation of 4,200 km of drinking water systems and 2,500 km of sewerage networks. The volume distributed is in order of 555,000 m3 per day.
In April 2011, Brousse said SAUR formed a joint venture with Marafiq, the first private water and electricity utility company in Saudi Arabia, to operate and maintain water and wastewater assets in the industrial city of Jubail.
The joint venture operates installations of significant size. For potable water, three desalination units of 37,800 m3/d, two water tanks, two major pumping stations and 29 secondary stations and 885 km network.
SanitationOne wastewater treatment plant of 140,000 m3/day for domestic wastewater, 586 km of network, 58 pumping stations and 222 lift stations, one wastewater treatment plants for industrial water of 120,000 m3/d, 35 km of network and 35 pumping stations. Seawater cooling is used for the cooling of industrial installations.
Marafiq pumps annually around 9 billion m3 of seawater to provide the industrial areas.
“This new strategic partnership is a strong reflection of SAUR’s commitment and focus on long-term investment in Saudi Arabia as well as recognition of its expertise and sustainable implementation in the Kingdom,” Brousse said.
“The annual turnover of this joint venture for 2012 is estimated around $ 80 million,” he added.
Brousse, however, said water resources management during peak events like the Haj season, when the level of inhabitants is dramatically increases, could be considered as one of the main challenges for SAUR.
He said one of the achievements of SAUR is in contributing to the successful implementation of the integrated operational plan to mobilize quantity of water in all water reservoirs, estimated to be about two million and half cubic meters spread across Makkah among which one reservoir — the “million” reservoir — was filled well in time before Haj.


Adnoc signs deal with Eni on Ghasha concession

Updated 13 November 2018
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Adnoc signs deal with Eni on Ghasha concession

  • ADNOC grants Eni 25 percent stake in ultra sour gas project
  • Follows Adnoc award to France's Total

LONDON: The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) has granted the Italian oil company Eni a 25 percent stake in an off-shore gas mega-project, in a move that will support the emirate’s efforts to become self-sufficient in gas.
The energy company is now in discussions with other potential partners for the remaining 15 percent of the available 40 percent stake in the concession earmarked for foreign companies.
The award covers the Ghasha ultra-sour gas concession just off the coast of the UAE, including the Hail and Dalma and other offshore fields. Eni will contribute 25 percent of the development cost of the project which is likely to cost billions of dollars.
The deal comes just days after ADNOC awarded a 40 percent stake to French oil firm Total on Nov. 11 to explore and develop its Ruwais Diyab unconventional gas concession.
The Ghasha gas fields are estimated to hold trillions of standard cubic feet of recoverable gas, according to a company statement.
Once on stream, the project is expected to produce more than 1.5 billion cubic feet of gas per day. This could provide enough gas to supply electricity to more than 2 million homes, said ADNOC.
The project is set to produce 120,000 barrels of oil and high-value condensate per day once complete, the company said.
“ADNOC is committed to ensuring a stable and economic gas supply to the UAE, which is a core component of our 2030 strategy,” said Sultan Ahmed Al-Jaber, UAE minister of state and ADNOC group CEO.
“Development of our Hail, Ghasha and Dalma ultra-sour gas offshore resources, at commercial rates, will make a significant contribution towards delivering that strategic imperative and bringing forward the day when the UAE will not only be self-sufficient in gas but also transitions to net exporter of gas,” he said.
Eni won its first concession rights in the emirate’s oil and gas sector earlier this year, with Adnoc granting the Italian firm a 10 percent interest in its Umm Shaif and Nasr concession and a 5 percent stake in the Lower Zakum concession in March.
“We are pursuing a strategy of growing in the Middle East and today’s signature is further confirmation of our willingness to root our presence in Abu Dhabi,
following the agreements signed last March, with Adnoc,” said Eni CEO, Claudio Descalzi, in a statement.
ADNOC is exploring opportunities beyond Abu Dhabi, having also signed a framework agreement with the Uzbek energy company, Uzbekneftegaz on Tuesday.
The agreement will see the Gulf company provide advice on Uzbekistan’s upstream and downstream operations.