Lankan convicted of practicing black magic

Updated 09 February 2013

Lankan convicted of practicing black magic

A Sri Lankan domestic worker was sentenced to one in year jail and 100 lashes following a conviction for practicing black magic among his friends in Riyadh.
Sri Lankan Embassy sources said the accused was Premanath Pereralage Thungasiri, who was working as a house driver in a Saudi home.
An embassy official, who had met Thungasiri in jail, said that Thungasiri had been booked by police in the Ummul Hammam district on charges of black magic and for violating local regulations by meeting an unknown woman, which is against Saudi law.
The arrest was made in May when Thungasiri had visited another Saudi’s house to resolve a dispute involving a housemaid there. He said the maid was his relative, and during the dispute police arrested him.
Thungasiri has a wife, daughter and son at home in Padiyatalawe, 200 kilometers from Colombo.
According to a jail official, Thungasiri will complete the one-year jail term this May.
Thungasiri’s name has been listed in the amnesty list and if the clemency is given early, there are chances for him to be deported home even before his scheduled release.
The Sri Lankan Embassy is yet to receive the copy of the official court verdict on Thungasiri’s judgment through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Prior to the verdict, Thungasiri said in a statement to the embassy that his Saudi sponsor had nothing to do with the case, and had surrendered his passport and other documents to prison authorities for his deportation.
Recently a Sri Lankan woman was arrested on suspicion of practicing witchcraft after she allegedly gazed at a child in a shopping complex while wearing a black cord around her wrist, the report said.
The organization accused the Sri Lanka Bureau of Foreign Employment of not educating Sri Lankan workers traveling to Saudi Arabia on the country’s religious laws.
The diplomat also stressed millions of foreign workers who come to the Kingdom for employment are expected to abide by the host country’s regulations.

 


Madinah museum showcases over 2,000 rare artifacts

Updated 23 August 2019

Madinah museum showcases over 2,000 rare artifacts

  • The museum has issued more than 44 books and publications on Madinah’s architecture

MADINAH: Dar Al-Madinah Museum offers visitors the opportunity to view historical pieces associated with the Prophet’s life. It features artifacts that capture the history, heritage, social life and culture of Madinah.

The museum’s executive director, Hassan Taher, said that it aims to promote the noble values of the Prophet Muhammad, encourage a sense of belonging and capture the history, culture and heritage of Madinah. The exhibits start with the Prophet’s life and end with the Saudi era.

Taher said: “The museum carries out specialized research in Madinah’s architectural heritage. It contains a library of relevant books, research and magazines, all of which are accessible to researchers.”

He said that the museum has issued more than 44 books and publications on Madinah’s architecture.

Taher explained that when preparing the museum’s narrative, it was necessary to reconcile temporal and spatial contexts so they created an added moral and intellectual value for the visitor.

He added: “There are around 2,000 artifacts in the museum’s exhibition halls. These include antiquities, extremely accurate models, handicrafts, manuscripts, documents, correspondence, old publications, postage stamps, photographs and artworks.”

One of the museum’s most valuable exhibits is a large collection of rare pieces associated with important moments in the Prophet’s life and the history of Madinah. 

These include various parts of the Kaaba, rare coins used in Madinah during different eras, ancient pottery, Islamic manuscripts, jewelry and collectibles from the pre-Islamic era.

Taher said that the museum has a professional team of guides who speak several languages, including English, Turkish, Urdu and Malay.