Lankan mission slams false report on jailed maid

Updated 08 July 2012
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Lankan mission slams false report on jailed maid

The Sri Lankan Embassy has rejected reports in Colombo claiming yesterday a Sri Lankan domestic worker has been arrested in Saudi Arabia for worshipping a statue of the Buddha.
According to the Bodu Bala Senaa, a Buddhist organization based in Colombo, it was alleged the youth, identified as Premanath Pereralage Thungasiri, was arrested by Ummul Hamam police for worshipping the statue inside his home.
It was alleged in the report Saudi authorities were planning to execute him.
The report added: “Although a complaint has been lodged at the Sri Lanka Bureau of Foreign Employment in Colombo, under complaint no: CN/158/1205, so far no action has been taken.”
Reacting to the reports, a senior official from the mission said the whole story was totally fabricated and had nothing to do with idol worship.
The diplomat, who had met Thungasiri in jail yesterday, said that he had been booked on some other charges by police in the Ummul Hammam district.
According to the official, Thungasiri, who works as a driver, had visited another Saudi's house to resolve a dispute involving a housemaid there. He said the maid was his relative, and during the dispute police arrested him.
In his statement to the embassy, Thungasiri said his Saudi sponsor had nothing to do with the case and had surrendered his passport and other documents to prison authorities for his deportation.
It was further alleged by Bodu Bala Senaa that those employed in Muslim countries are prevented from practicing their religious faiths, and those found doing so are punished severely.
Recently a Sri Lankan woman was arrested for practicing witchcraft after she allegedly gazed at a child in a shopping complex while wearing a black cord around her wrist, the report said.
The organization accused the Sri Lanka Bureau of Foreign Employment of not educating Sri Lankan workers traveling to Saudi Arabia on the country’s religious laws.
Thungasiri has his wife and a daughter and son back home at Padiyatalawe, 200 km from Colombo.
The diplomat, responding to the allegations, said: “So far, no Sri Lankan has been found guilty of practicing his own religion in the Kingdom.”
He added no one had been executed for practicing their religion.
The official said that Vesak, the birth anniversary of the Buddha, was observed recently at the Lankan missions in the Kingdom. More than 20,000 expatriate workers attended the functions in Riyadh and Jeddah.
Subsequently, Poson, the day Buddhism was introduced to Sri Lanka, was also celebrated without any hassle at the mission's headquarters.
The diplomat said: “Besides Sri Lankan Muslim expatriates, Buddhists and Hindus from the island are also leading a happy and contented life in the Kingdom.”
He urged the Sri Lankan community not to allow parties with vested interests to tarnish the image of Saudi Arabia, home to 500,000 Sri Lankans.
The diplomat also stressed millions of foreign workers who come to the Kingdom for employment are expected to abide by the host country’s regulations.


Hong Kong bans pro-independence party

In this file photo taken on August 5, 2016, Andy Chan (R), leader of the pro-independence Hong Kong National Party (HKNP), gives a press conference at the start of a rally near the government's headquarters in Hong Kong. (AFP)
Updated 24 September 2018
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Hong Kong bans pro-independence party

  • The ban is likely to raise further questions about Beijing’s growing influence in the former British colony, which was promised semi-autonomy as part of the 1997 handover

HONG KONG: Authorities in Hong Kong on Monday took an unprecedented step against separatist voices by banning a political party that advocates independence for the southern Chinese territory on national security grounds.
John Lee, the territory’s secretary for security, announced that the Hong Kong National Party will be prohibited from operation from Monday.
Lee’s announcement did not provide further details. But Hong Kong’s security bureau had previously said in a letter to the National Party’s leader, 27-year-old Andy Chan, that the party should be dissolved “in the interests of national security or public safety, public order or the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.” Chan had no immediate comment.
That letter had cited a national security law that has not been invoked since 1997. The ban is likely to raise further questions about Beijing’s growing influence in the former British colony, which was promised semi-autonomy as part of the 1997 handover. Chinese President Xi Jinping and other officials have warned separatist activity would not be tolerated.
Chan, the National Party leader, had previously told The Associated Press that police approached him with documents detailing his speeches and activities since the party’s formation in 2016.
The party was founded in response to frustration about Beijing’s treatment of Hong Kong. Despite a promise of autonomy, activists complain mainland influence over its democratic elections is increasing.
Chan and other pro-independence candidates were disqualified from 2016 elections to the Hong Kong legislature after they refused to sign a pledge saying Hong Kong is an inalienable part of China. The Hong Kong National Party has never held any seats on the council.