Lankan mission slams false report on jailed maid

Updated 08 July 2012
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Lankan mission slams false report on jailed maid

The Sri Lankan Embassy has rejected reports in Colombo claiming yesterday a Sri Lankan domestic worker has been arrested in Saudi Arabia for worshipping a statue of the Buddha.
According to the Bodu Bala Senaa, a Buddhist organization based in Colombo, it was alleged the youth, identified as Premanath Pereralage Thungasiri, was arrested by Ummul Hamam police for worshipping the statue inside his home.
It was alleged in the report Saudi authorities were planning to execute him.
The report added: “Although a complaint has been lodged at the Sri Lanka Bureau of Foreign Employment in Colombo, under complaint no: CN/158/1205, so far no action has been taken.”
Reacting to the reports, a senior official from the mission said the whole story was totally fabricated and had nothing to do with idol worship.
The diplomat, who had met Thungasiri in jail yesterday, said that he had been booked on some other charges by police in the Ummul Hammam district.
According to the official, Thungasiri, who works as a driver, had visited another Saudi's house to resolve a dispute involving a housemaid there. He said the maid was his relative, and during the dispute police arrested him.
In his statement to the embassy, Thungasiri said his Saudi sponsor had nothing to do with the case and had surrendered his passport and other documents to prison authorities for his deportation.
It was further alleged by Bodu Bala Senaa that those employed in Muslim countries are prevented from practicing their religious faiths, and those found doing so are punished severely.
Recently a Sri Lankan woman was arrested for practicing witchcraft after she allegedly gazed at a child in a shopping complex while wearing a black cord around her wrist, the report said.
The organization accused the Sri Lanka Bureau of Foreign Employment of not educating Sri Lankan workers traveling to Saudi Arabia on the country’s religious laws.
Thungasiri has his wife and a daughter and son back home at Padiyatalawe, 200 km from Colombo.
The diplomat, responding to the allegations, said: “So far, no Sri Lankan has been found guilty of practicing his own religion in the Kingdom.”
He added no one had been executed for practicing their religion.
The official said that Vesak, the birth anniversary of the Buddha, was observed recently at the Lankan missions in the Kingdom. More than 20,000 expatriate workers attended the functions in Riyadh and Jeddah.
Subsequently, Poson, the day Buddhism was introduced to Sri Lanka, was also celebrated without any hassle at the mission's headquarters.
The diplomat said: “Besides Sri Lankan Muslim expatriates, Buddhists and Hindus from the island are also leading a happy and contented life in the Kingdom.”
He urged the Sri Lankan community not to allow parties with vested interests to tarnish the image of Saudi Arabia, home to 500,000 Sri Lankans.
The diplomat also stressed millions of foreign workers who come to the Kingdom for employment are expected to abide by the host country’s regulations.


India launches world’s biggest health care scheme, dubbed as ‘Modicare’ 

Updated 23 September 2018
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India launches world’s biggest health care scheme, dubbed as ‘Modicare’ 

  •  “Modicare” plans to provide around $7,000 of medical coverage to half a billion people
  • The program has been launched in 400 districts out of 640 in India

NEW DELHI: Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi launched a mega health care scheme, touted as the world’s biggest public health scheme, on Sunday in the eastern Indian state of Jharkhand. 

The National Health Protection Scheme, popularly known as “Modicare,” plans to provide around $7,000 of medical coverage to 100 million families or 500 million people, accounting for around 41 percent of people who fall below the poverty line.

 “The aim is to provide medical care to the people standing at the very margin of society. It has been a dream to provide health care to the needy and that dream is coming true today,” Modi said in a speech after inaugurating the scheme.

 “This is the first time in the world that a health care program is being launched where an individual will have an insurance cover of 5 lakh rupees ($7,000).”

The program has been launched in 400 districts out of 640 in India.

The intervention is meant to take the burden off the government hospitals and bring the expensive private hospitals within the reach of poor people.

For Ganesh Yadav, a daily wage earner, the “Ayushman Bharat Yojna,” as the program is officially called, is “a good move by the government if it really works.

 “Last year I spent more than 50,000 rupees ($720) in getting a kidney stone removed in a private hospital and I am still struggling to pay back the debt that I incurred. If the Modicare really works then poor people like me will not have to worry about the expenses in health care,” said Yadav, who lives in Noida, a satellite town of Delhi.

But one doctor raises doubts about the success of the program.

“An earlier health scheme also had the provision for insurance cover but the out-of-cost expenses of the poor people could not come down. There is a lack of clarity on this issue in the new scheme as well,” says Dr. Shakil, a cardiologist based in Patna, the capital of the eastern Indian state of Bihar.
 
Talking to Arab News, he asks: “How will you identify the real beneficiaries? Besides, the scheme will not build public health infrastructure but give benefit to the private players, which I think is the real drawback of this policy.
 
“The government is in a hurry to launch the scheme and not many preparations have gone into it before inaugurating it.”

Economist Venkat Narayana questions the budgetary provisions for the scheme. “Under the scheme 60 percent of expenses would be borne by the central government and 40 percent by the state government. But the poorer states cannot afford the huge sums involved in the expenditure,” says Narayana, who also runs NGOs for poor people in Warangal district in the South Indian state of Telangana.

“My experience suggests that such a program does not address the real health care needs of the people living in villages and smaller cities. The money that the government plans to spend on insurance can be spent in expanding and enriching the medical infrastructure across the country.”

But Nirala, a political activist associated with the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, feels that “this is a visionary intervention in the health care system of the country.

“Modi has tried to address the gap that exists in medical system of the country by bringing private hospitals within the reach of the poor masses,” he told Arab News.

Political analyst Pawan Pratyay, however, feels that Prime Minister Modi "has played a big political gamble in the election year by launching this attractive looking and sounding health care policy.

“The government has been cutting the health budget year after year. By bringing this pro-poor scheme Modi wants to change the pro-rich image that he has acquired over the years and attract the voters from the economically marginalized demography.”