Lebanon lawyer files ‘genocide’ case against Syria minister

Updated 24 December 2012
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Lebanon lawyer files ‘genocide’ case against Syria minister

BEIRUT: A Lebanese lawyer said he filed a lawsuit on Monday against Syrian Interior Minister Mohammed Al-Shaar, accusing him of having ordered hundreds of killings in the northern city of Tripoli in 1986.
Lawyer Tareq Shandab said he filed the case as Shaar is currently undergoing treatment at the American University Hospital for light wounds from a December 12 suicide bomb attack on the interior ministry in Damascus.
The case accuses Shaar, who in 1986 was in charge of security in Tripoli, of “genocide, ethnic cleansing, political assassination and the killing of religious officials and children in Bab Al-Tebbaneh, Tripoli, in 1986,” he told AFP.
It alleges that Shaar and his aides along with “criminal” Lebanese accomplices on December 19, 1986 “killed and slaughtered more than 600 people from the Tebbaneh district.”
At the time, Lebanon was immersed in a bloody civil war that broke out in 1975 and left some 150,000 people dead over 15 years.
Syria dominated Lebanon politically and militarily for nearly 30 years until international pressure led Damascus to withdraw its troops shortly after the assassination of former premier Rafiq Hariri in 2005.


Dozens of bodies found in Raqqa mass grave

Updated 31 min 47 sec ago
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Dozens of bodies found in Raqqa mass grave

  • Raqqa was the de facto “capital” of the Daesh group in northern Syria until the terror group was ousted by the US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces in October 2017
  • Daesh has been held responsible for multiple atrocities during its reign of terror, including mass executions and decapitations

QAMISHLI, Syria: Dozens of bodies, including those of jihadists and civilians, have been found in a mass grave in the former Daesh group stronghold of Raqqa in Syria, a local official said on Saturday.
The former de facto “capital” of the group in northern Syria, Raqqa saw the jihadists ousted by the US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces in October 2017.
Nearly 50 bodies had already been recovered from the mass grave, which could contain up to 200 bodies, Abdallah Al-Eriane, a senior official with Raqqa Civil Council now running the city, said,
The mass grave was located under a football pitch, close to a hospital where the jihadists had dug in before being chased out of the city.
“It was apparently the only place available for burials, which were done in haste. The jihadists were holed up in the hospital,” the official said, adding that some bodies were marked with the nom de guerre of the jihadist while civilians just had first names.
In recent months, both Syria and Iraq have discovered mass graves in areas previously occupied by the jihadists.
Syrian troops uncovered a mass grave containing the remains of more than 30 people killed by Daesh in Raqqa province in February.
It followed two other similar finds by the Syrian army.
The Daesh group, which proclaimed a “caliphate” over swathes of Syria and Iraq in 2014, has now lost almost all the land it once controlled.
It has been held responsible for multiple atrocities during its reign of terror, including mass executions and decapitations.