Makkah slum dwellers fear eviction

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Updated 13 November 2012
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Makkah slum dwellers fear eviction

MAKKAH: Close to the Grand Mosque and the glitzy 5-star hotels surrounding it lie slums whose mostly immigrant dwellers fear they will be evicted to make way for new high rises and malls.
In one such slum on Jabal Omar, humans, cats, lizards and mosquitoes coexist among piles of garbage, with sewage running openly along the narrow tracks on the rugged hill.
Children and old men in rags move about idly among the cracked adobe buildings.
The impoverished neighborhoods are divided by nationality, with the Yemeni quarter at the bottom of the hill, then the Africans and finally, at the very top, the Burmese, residents say.
"I first arrived here from Yemen when I was 15 years old," says 58-year-old Abu Ali. "I used to work as a plumber, but now that I've grown old and weak I work as a janitor."
Despite such squalid conditions, "I'm better off here than I would be in Yemen," said Abu Ali, referring to Yemen, from which many try to flee to Saudi Arabia in search of a better life.
Further up the hill's steep incline dotted with piles of trash, 24-year-old Mohammed Saleh sits on a time-worn step joking with a group of friends.
Beneath his tough exterior, Saleh reveals a vulnerable young man to whom life has not been so kind. "I couldn't continue my studies after my father was diagnosed with cancer," says Saleh, a sharp-eyed Yemeni who was born and raised on Jabal Omar.
"I'm happy here. It's a great neighborhood," he says with a grin. "Really, as long as I'm on the mountain I'm happy."
"Killings and thefts are more frequent if you climb further up the mountain, but here we haven't got such things," he says.
Saleh says many of the people living on Jabal Omar have been there "for 40 and 50 years. They are used to it... They could live nowhere else."
He points at a thick cable running along the ground where a stream of sewage is flowing. "This is the electricity we get," he says. "As for water, we haven't had any in about two months."
The residents of this and other poor neighborhoods across the holy city fear only one thing: a plan by the authorities to demolish the whole area to give way to modern developments.
"I rent the house I'm living in now for SR 1,000," said Abu Ali. "If it's gone, I wouldn't be able to find another apartment for less than SR 2,000. That's my whole salary."
Makkah Mayor Osama Albar has said the slum development project will cost "around $ 3 billion" and will take place in phases.
It will offer home owners living in these shabby, hilly neighborhoods a choice of either selling their properties to the government or taking shares in the new projects.
People who have rented apartments there, mostly immigrants, will also be offered assistance in finding flats at prices similar to what they now pay.
Around the Grand Mosque, the government has for years been expanding facilities to accommodate the increasing numbers of pilgrims arriving every year for Haj and Umrah. The ancient mud brick buildings have given way to skyscrapers.
The Makkah Development Authority's website says the slums in Makkah, as well as in Jeddah and Taif, where a combined total of nearly one million people live, "create a security, environmental and health challenge."
In Makkah, some 70 slums make up 25 percent of the city's urban area, it says.
Jabal Omar Development Co says it is developing a 230,000 sq. meter project, of which 52 percent will be dedicated to residential buildings.
The company's development, which also features towers and shopping areas, lies across the road from the Grand Mosque's plaza.
At the foot of the hill, African women, most of them Nigerians who usually come during Haj and stay, spread along the road selling anything they can get their hands on, including food, clothing and carpets.
"I come with my mother's friends who sell things here," says 16-year-old Shaza. "We sell everything."
"We're fine here, but we're now worried about having our houses demolished," she said. If this happens, "we don't know what we'll do. If we can, we'll stay here. Otherwise we'll have to return home."


A journey to Hajj that changed Islam in America

Updated 11 min 36 sec ago
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A journey to Hajj that changed Islam in America

MAKKAH: Malcolm X was an American Muslim minister and human rights activist. To his admirers he was a courageous advocate for the rights of blacks, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans. But his detractors accused him of preaching racism and violence.

He has been called one of the greatest and most influential African Americans in history. Malcolm was a member of the Nation of Islam, an African American politico-religious movement founded by Wallace D. Fard Muhammad in the 1930s.Their goals were to improve the spiritual, mental, social, and economic conditions of African Americans in the US. Critics have described the organization as black supremacist.
Malcolm formally left the organization and made a Muslim pilgrimage to Makkah, where he was profoundly affected by the lack of racial discord among orthodox Muslims. He returned to America as Al-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz and founded the Organization of Afro-American Unity, which advocated black identity and held that racism, not the white race, was the greatest foe of the African American. Malcolm’s new movement steadily gained followers, and his more moderate philosophy became increasingly influential in the civil rights movement, especially among the leaders of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. This organization was founded after Malcolm’s awakening from his pilgrimage to Makkah.
“Never have I witnessed such sincere hospitality and overwhelming spirit of true brotherhood as is practiced by people of all colors and races here in this ancient Holy Land, the home of Abraham, Mohammad and all the other Prophets of the Holy Scriptures,” Malcolm X wrote in his letter from Makkah, a letter that he spent the night duplicating while staying there. He sent a copy to his wife and his older sister Ella. He also asked for a copy to be sent to the press in the US.
He also wrote: “During the past 11 days here in the Muslim world, I have eaten from the same plate, drunk from the same glass, and slept on the same rug — while praying to the same God — with fellow Muslims.” He ends his letter: “Never have I been so highly honored. Never have I been made to feel more humble and unworthy.”
He signed his name with his new title Al-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz. “Al-Hajj” is a title given to those who performed the pilgrimage.
When Malcolm first arrived at Jeddah Airport, he noticed that the people there were pilgrims from Ghana, Indonesia, Japan and Russia. He then explained in his biography: “I don’t believe that motion picture cameras ever have filmed a human spectacle more colorful than my eyes took in.” He concluded “Chinese, Indonesians, Afghans. Many, not yet changed into the Ihram garb, still wore their international dresses. It was like pages out of the National Geographic magazine.”
On Feb. 21, 1965, one week after his home was firebombed, Malcolm X was shot dead by Nation of Islam members while speaking at a rally of his organization in New York City.