Malala discharged from hospital

Updated 08 February 2013
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Malala discharged from hospital

LONDON: A Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taleban for advocating girls’ education has been discharged from a British hospital where she had reconstructive surgery on her skull.
The attack on Malala Yousufzai, 15, was condemned worldwide and made her a symbol of resistance to the militant group’s crackdown on women’s rights.
She was flown from Pakistan to Britain for specialist treatment after the Oct. 9 assault.
The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in the English city of Birmingham where Yousufzai was treated said on Friday she had made a good recovery and would continue her rehabilitation nearby at her family’s temporary home.
She left the hospital on Thursday after her medical team decided she was well enough to be discharged.
Yousufzai was shot at point blank range as she left school in the Swat valley. The bullet shattered parts of her skull and left her deaf in one ear.
Surgeons replaced part of her skull with a titanium plate and fitted a cochlear implant to restore hearing in her left ear on Feb. 2.
Speaking the day after the five-hour operation Malala said she was feeling better and expected to get well very soon.
“The thing is my mission is the same, to help people, and I will do that,” she said.
The hospital did not say whether there were any plans for her to return to Pakistan.


Politician Anwar Ibrahim lauds Malaysian reform movement

Updated 15 min 22 sec ago
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Politician Anwar Ibrahim lauds Malaysian reform movement

  • Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad is making good on his promises by replacing key government officials
  • Anwar Ibrahim was speaking at a press conference with former Indonesian President Bacharudin Jusuf Habibie

JAKARTA: Malaysia’s reform movement is on the right track, the country’s veteran politician Anwar Ibrahim said on Sunday at a press conference with former Indonesian President Bacharudin Jusuf Habibie.
A week after he was sworn in, Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad is making good on his promises by replacing key government officials with those who are committed to reform, Ibrahim added.
He was in Jakarta for a two-day visit at the invitation of Habibie, who ushered in reform in Indonesia after three decades of dictatorship.
“Indonesia’s experience of transforming from the old system was able to change society into a democratic system,” Ibrahim said.
A team from Malaysia should evaluate and review Indonesia’s experience in reform, from Habibie’s administration to that of current President Joko Widodo, Ibrahim added.
Key government institutions in Malaysia, such as the judicial system, should be led by officials who are committed to reform and willing to serve the people, he said. Habibie said both countries can learn from each other about reform.
Ibrahim said he told Mohamad that the probe against former Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak over the alleged misuse of state fund 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) should be in accordance with the law.
“I firmly told… Mahathir to follow the law. Do not punish before we have a thorough investigation,” said Ibrahim. “Do not repeat what they did to me. Just do it according to the law.”
He said Mohamad gave assurances to Razak that the judges will be free from any political influence, and he advised the former prime minister to find a good lawyer.
The visit was Ibrahim’s first trip abroad since he was released from jail and cleared of all sodomy charges last week.