Manassero holds nerve to win in playoff

Updated 12 November 2012
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Manassero holds nerve to win in playoff

SINGAPORE: Italian teenager Matteo Manassero holed a 12-foot eagle putt on the third play-off hole to claim a dramatic victory over South Africa’s Louis Oosthuizen at the Barclays Singapore Open on Sunday.
In his first ever play-off, Manassero showed steel beyond his 19 years as he matched the 2010 British Open winner with birdie and par on the first two extra holes and then nervelessly downed the winner at a packed Sentosa Golf Club.
In denying Oosthuizen, Manassero also clinched this season’s European money title for world number one Rory McIlroy, making him only the second man to win the merit race on both sides of the Atlantic in the same year.
It settled a marathon final day for the $6 million tournament after storm delays earlier in the week meant Manassero had to play 36 holes in Singapore’s tropical heat on Sunday.
“It’s been an extremely long day,” said Manassero after the $1 million win, the biggest of his career following the 2010 Castello Masters and last year’s Malaysian Open.
“The adrenaline kept me going and the key I think was starting really well this morning... and the play-off was a great honor. It’s the first play-off of my career, it’s been amazing.”
Manassero, who in 2010 became the youngest man to make the cut at the Masters and was crowned the European Tour’s youngest ever winner, is now also the youngest champion in the Singapore Open’s 51-year history.
Oosthuizen has won twice this year but he was forced to revisit the disappointment of the US Masters play-off in April, when he lost out to Bubba Watson’s famous hook shot from the trees.
Earlier, McIlroy eagled his last hole for a 65 and third place, three shots behind the leaders. A win for Oosthuizen was the only result which would have delayed him from taking the European money title.
“It has always been one of my goals to become number one in Europe ever since securing my tour card five years ago, but then to also end the year as both European and PGA Tour number one is just amazing,” McIlroy said.
Overnight leader Thomas Bjorn finished four adrift on nine-under for the tournament, while three-time winner Adam Scott and Italy’s Francesco Molinari shared fifth, one stroke further back.
After lightning storms disrupted the first two days, players were on the course early to complete the third round and Manassero finished with a 64 to take a two-shot lead.
Organizers gambled on fine weather as they pressed ahead with the fourth round, rather than cutting the event to 54 holes, and under fine skies it developed into a duel between the young Italian and Oosthuizen, 30.
Oosthuizen made a great par save after finding water on the seventh hole, and then birdied three in a row around the turn to join Manassero in the lead at 13 under par.
Consecutive bogeys on 12 and 13 seemed to put Oosthuizen out of it — but he fired back with a chip-in birdie on 14, and when Manassero bunkered on the 15th for bogey, the scores were level again.
A fabulous chip to within two feet on 18 looked to have given Oosthuizen the outright win as he finished his round on 67 for a 13-under-par total of 271.
But under pressure on his last hole, Manassero found two huge shots to reach the green and two-putted from 60 feet to force the play-off with a closing score of 69.
On the first play-off hole, the par-five 18th, Manassero put his second shot into bunkerside rough short of the green while Oosthuizen dropped his 40 feet right of the pin.
Manassero chipped to within three feet, but Oosthuizen pushed his long putt seven feet past the hole before bravely holing out to extend the play-off.
Teeing off again on 18, the South African drove into a fairway bunker but he laid up and then arrowed his approach to four feet, as Manassero again found greenside rough and chipped to 15 feet.
As Manassero missed his putt, Oosthuizen had it in the bag, but his putt lipped out in a scarcely believable miss.
On the third hole, Manassero’s second shot rolled off a greenside bank to within 12 feet, and the Italian held his nerve to down the difficult, downhill putt.
“I putted like anyone who would have putted for a win,” said Oosthuizen, reliving his miss on the second extra hole. “I was putting beautifully today but the ball just didn’t go in. It’s been a story for the last four weeks.”


‘Man, I was so surprised’: Saudi Olympian Al-Muawi clinches bronze in Argentina games

The podium for the Athletics Mens 200m: Haruto Deguchi JPN (centre, Gold Medalist), Daniel Huller HUN (left, Silver Medalist) and Mohammed Duhaim M Almuawi KSA (right, Bronze Medalist) at the Athletics Field, Youth Olympic Park. The Youth Olympic Games, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Tuesday 16th October 2018. Photo: Ivo Gonzalez for OIS/IOC. (Handout image supplied by OIS/IOC)
Updated 17 October 2018
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‘Man, I was so surprised’: Saudi Olympian Al-Muawi clinches bronze in Argentina games

  • Al-Muawi has been racing hurdles for five years after picking it out as a sport he could excel in at the age of 12

BUENOS AIRES: With his bag packed and preparing to leave the Youth Olympic Park one last time on Tuesday night, Mohammed Al-Muawi was called back to the scene of the 400-metres Hurdles event, in which he had just finished fourth overall. With doping officials thronged at the entrance, he assumed he must have been randomly selected for testing. Instead, he got the news he will now never forget.

The 17-year-old Saudi is an Olympic bronze medallist.

“Man, I was so surprised to find out,” he told Arab News after being promoted onto the podium after South Africa’s Lindukhule Gora was disqualified. “It was my first competition and my first medal, so it’s amazing. This here means everything to me. When I finished the race, I was like ‘OK, fourth is OK’. I put my clothes back on and got ready to leave, but then they told me: ‘Come back, come back! You have a bronze medal!’ I was like, ‘What? How is that even possible?’”

Under a blistering sun and having led for much of the first 300m, Al-Muawi tired as the home straight loomed, crossing the finish-line fifth with a time of 53.05s. With Gora being disqualified for stepping out of his lane, however, Al-Muawi was immediately pushed up a place. Then, having bettered France’s Martin Fraysse’s time in the first-stage heat, it came down to the calculator.

Al-Muawi was 0.37s faster than Fraysse in the first heat, while Fraysse finished the second just 0.33s ahead. The result: the Asian Youth Championships silver-medallist posted a combined time of 1.45.81, making him the third quickest across a field of continental winners, beating Fraysse by just 0.04s.

“It's confusing for sure, but across the two heats, I was second and fourth, so I feel third is deserved," he said, looking down and caressing the bronze medal hanging from his neck. "It was a very strong field in the final. I started well, but the last 100m or so was very tiring and I was unable to really open my legs. It’s been an amazing experience though. Wow. I love the competition, the village, eating the different foods…it’s been unforgettable. And this just tops it all off.”

Al-Muawi splits his time between schooling in Bisha in the south of the Kingdom and training in Los Angeles, California, with World Championships silver-medallist Ryan Wilson. Saudi athletics delegation head, Saad Al-Asmari — himself a former 3000m Asian champion — expects this to be the start of more success not only for Al-Muawi but for Saudi athletics.

“Mohammed did very well,” said Al-Asmari. “He ran very well and it was only in the final 100 metres he had some problems. This result is very good for him and I’m very happy because he is only 17. Also, we have many other talents like this in Saudi Arabia. We have many athletes, but we need good coaching.

“Mohammed has been training since May in LA, which is where we send all our best athletes. When they come back, we always notice little differences: their body shape changes, their technique, endurance, everything.”

Al-Muawi has been racing hurdles for five years after picking it out as a sport he could excel in at the age of 12. He will head home to Bisha now to spend time with his family and continue his studies for two months before returning to LA to prepare for next year’s Asian Championships. The most important lesson he has learnt from Wilson in the United States is not physical, but rather psychological, he said.

“It’s has been a great experience for me over there so far,” he added, his English having improved considerably since his switch. “My coach there has shown support throughout, always telling me that I can do it. Always urging me to never give up. He tells me that before every competition I must tell myself: ‘I am hungry’. He tells me always that I’m a different breed too, so I guess I then begin to believe it — yes, I am a different breed."