Mandatory alimony payments from ex-husbands eyed

Updated 10 February 2013
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Mandatory alimony payments from ex-husbands eyed

In response to large numbers of ex-husbands dragging their feet or worse when making alimony payments, the National Family Safety Program (NFSP) and Human Rights Organization as well as a number of Saudi legislators have called for such payments to be deducted directly from the salary of the ex-husband, a local newspaper reported.
Abdurrahman Al-Qurrash, a member of the program, demanded that the Ministry of the Interior order the Ministry of Justice to issue binding regulations regarding such deductions, and that the Ministry of Social Affairs assume the payments in the event that a father cannot or does not pay.
“Despite the suffering and bitterness that children of divorced couples experience, both their fathers and mothers seek revenge on one another by not paying their sons and daughters what is legally theirs,” said Al-Qurrash. He added that some fathers simply ignore the rights of their children, while the divorced woman intentionally disparages her ex-husband’s reputation in the presence of her children.
Norah Al-Ajlan, a member of the Human Rights Organization said that in the majority of cases she handles, the father refuses to pay the alimony. “There must exist a binding mechanism to force payment so as to mitigate the suffering of women and children,” she said. “I personally wonder why women should be forced to give up their legal rights in order to have custody of their children.”
She demanded that committees made up of social workers and women’s advocates be created so as to ensure the rights of all parties involved.
Mohammad Al-Najmi, member of the International Islamic Fiqh Academy, confirmed that alimony is obligatory for fathers in all cases. “It is a lawful right of children and fathers should not ignore it or turn their backs,” he said, adding that the sum should be deducted directly from the father’s salary via banks or other official institutions. “The most severe penalties should be imposed on those stalling,” he said.
“’Upon the father is the mothers’ provision and their clothing according to what is acceptable’, says the Holy Qur’an,” said Naif Al-Omari, a legal counselor in Jeddah. “Otherwise, the matter should be in the hands of the court to decide.”


World Scouting, Saudi Arabian Scout Association discuss global assessment tool

SASA has been helping Hajj pilgrims for 47 years. (SPA)
Updated 13 November 2018
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World Scouting, Saudi Arabian Scout Association discuss global assessment tool

  • The association prepared for the jamboree by setting up a radio station in its headquarters of the association in Riyadh

JEDDAH: World Scouting, represented by the Global Support Assessment Committee (GSAT), held a meeting with the members of the secretariat of the Saudi Arabian Scout Association (SASA) at its headquarters in Riyadh on Sunday.
They discussed the final evaluation stages by using the Global Support Assessment Tool (GSAT) adopted by the World Scouting for the assessment of its member countries.
The meeting also reviewed the criteria for global evaluation and all its procedures to ensure quality.
The Saudi association joined the World Organization of the Scout Movement (WOSM) in 1963 and hosted the Arab Jamboree in Taif in 2000. There are over 50 million Scouts in the world and 28 million of them are Muslim.
SASA has been helping Hajj pilgrims for 47 years, adapting along the way to keep up with changing times and making use of new technologies.
Recently, SASA took part in the World Scout Jamboree Jota 61 on the Air and Joti 22 on the internet. The association prepared for the jamboree by setting up a radio station in its headquarters of the association in Riyadh.