Arab Spring states must respect rights, says Human Rights Watch

Updated 01 February 2013
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Arab Spring states must respect rights, says Human Rights Watch

LONDON: The euphoria of the Arab Spring has given way to abuses as new governments fail to respect freedom of expression and other basic rights, Human Rights Watch warned in its annual report yesterday.
The US-based group urged the fledgling regimes of countries such as Egypt, Libya and Tunisia to build “genuine” democracies, saying that even democratically-elected governments did not have a mandate to ignore human rights.
“It’s been two years now, almost to the day, since the euphoria of those early days when we saw dictator after dictator toppling in the Middle East and North Africa,” HRW’s executive director Kenneth Roth told reporters in London.
“That early euphoria has given way to often despair and deep concern over what turned out to be a much more difficult situation than many perhaps had hoped.”
“It turns out, in fact, the toppling of a dictator may have been the easy part,” said Roth. “The difficult part is replacing that repressive regime with a rights-respecting democracy.”
In some countries freedom of expression is being restricted, HRW’s executive director warned.
“We’ve seen an unfortunate tendency on the part of new governments throughout the region to suppress speech that is critical of them, critical of the judiciary, critical of religion.”
Ultimately, Roth said, it is up to the region’s governments to build a brighter future for their citizens than the dictators they replaced.
“Treacherous as the path ahead is, it is simply wrong to consign people to the grim future of authoritarian rule and repression.”
Even in Syria, where the brutal conflict goes on 22 months after the uprising against Bashar Assad started, Roth said it was “not too early to begin to try to prepare for a better future”.
HRW has been closely monitoring fighters in preparation for a possible power transition, the group’s director said.


Egypt court orders one month YouTube block over Islam film

Updated 26 May 2018
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Egypt court orders one month YouTube block over Islam film

  • A lower court had ordered the video sharing site be blocked in 2013 after it carried the video "Innocence of Muslims"

CAIRO: Egypt’s top administrative court ordered authorities Saturday to block video-sharing website YouTube in the country for a month, after a years-long appeals process over a film denigrating Islam’s Prophet Muhammad, a judicial official said.
A lower court had ordered the video sharing site be blocked in 2013 after it carried the video “Innocence of Muslims,” but the case was appealed by Egypt’s National Telecommunications Regulatory Authority and its ruling was stayed.
The 2012 amateurish film depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a buffoon and a paedophile, and sparked a wave of angry anti-American protests across the Middle East in which more than 30 people were killed.
Washington sought to keep a lid on the demonstrations by saying the controversial film was made privately with no official backing.
US officials said freedom of speech laws prevented them from stopping the production of inflammatory material.
The ruling is considered final and cannot be appealed.
As of Saturday afternoon, YouTube was still accessible in Cairo.