Ministry won’t entertain requests for cancellation of ‘hurub’ from Sept. 17

Updated 20 August 2012
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Ministry won’t entertain requests for cancellation of ‘hurub’ from Sept. 17

The Ministry of Labor has instructed all offices not to entertain the requests for canceling ‘hurub’ (disappearance of foreign workers) applications, effective Sept. 17.
“The measure was taken to reduce the number of applications we receive from employers regarding hurub of their foreign workers,” said Ahmed bin Saleh Al-Humaidan, deputy minister for labor affairs.
He said the ministry would impose tough punishment on companies and individuals who make unlawful and unjust hurub announcements to deny their workers financial or legal rights.
“Companies and individuals have no right to cancel the applications stating the hurub of their workers. At the same time, workers have the right to do so if their employers had presented such applications to cheat them,” Al-Humaidan said.
He said hurub applications would not be counted in the Nitaqat system. “We’ll consider it only after changing information at the Interior Ministry regarding the absconding foreign worker,” he pointed out.
However, Al-Humaidan said companies in the Premium and Green categories would be allowed to cancel ‘hurub’ applications until Sept. 17, which had been presented before that date.
Referring to the punishment for those employers or sponsors who make false ‘hurub’ announcements, Al-Humaidan said: “For the first offense, we’ll stop our services to the company or establishment for a year. For the second offense, we’ll stop our services for five years.”
A number of experts in the Kingdom believe that the new measure would complicate the process of sponsorship transfer.
Companies used to give workers two to three months to transfer their sponsorships to other firms, but if the workers failed to change their sponsorships within that period, the previous companies would make the ‘hurub’ announcements.
Most foreign workers find it difficult to get new jobs or sponsors within two months. This will naturally increase the number of ‘hurub’ cases.
Muhammad Al-Sayyed, an Egyptian who works for a contracting company in Jeddah, said “Many expatriates have fallen prey to ‘hurub’ cases because of their inability to find suitable sponsors within a period specified by the existing sponsors.”
Although the new ministry decision allows expatriates to cancel false ‘hurub’ announcements, it would be difficult for them to prove that the ‘hurub’ applications presented by their former sponsors were based on false reasons. In the past, companies used to send their representatives to the Labor Office to help foreign workers cancel the ‘hurub’ applications presented against them.
Fahd Al-Nuwaisser, a lawyer, said: “The ‘hurub’ takes place when a worker disappears for a long time without informing the sponsor. But some sponsors make ‘hurub’ announcements in order to get rid of their workers and get new work visas. In this situation, the worker has to prove that he is still working with the company, presenting witnesses of his colleagues or necessary documents. This will help them get the ‘hurub’ status removed.”
Al-Nuwaisser also pointed out that some sponsors take revenge from their foreign workers by making ‘hurub’ announcements against them, especially when they make any complaints against the sponsors at the labor office. “‘hurub’ has become a sword that has been used by some sponsors to threaten their workers.”

 


US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

Updated 18 November 2018
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US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

  • A US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case
  • ‘The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts’

JEDDAH: The US government denied on Saturday it had reached a final conclusion over the killing of Jamal Khashoggi after a US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case. 
“Recent reports indicating that the US government has made a final conclusion are inaccurate,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said.
“There remain numerous unanswered questions with respect to the murder of Mr. Khashoggi. The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts,” she said.
“In the meantime, we will continue to consult Congress, and work with other nations to hold accountable those involved in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi.”

But President Donald Trump told reporters on Saturday that his administration would get “a very full report,” including who was responsible for Khashoggi’s death, on Monday or Tuesday.
The Washington Post published an article citing anonymous sources, who it says are close to the CIA which suggests the Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman ordered the killing — something Saudi Arabia vehemently denies.
The Kingdom’s public prosecutor on Thursday released details of its investigation, saying the decision to kill the journalist was made by the head of a rogue mission during an attempt to repatriate him. The prosecutor is seeking the death penalty for five of the suspects. 
On Saturday, Donald Trump spoke with CIA Director Gina Haspel and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from Air Force One, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. 
Trump praised US relations with Saudi Arabia when he was asked about the case. Saudi Arabia is “a truly spectacular ally in terms of jobs and economic development,” the US president said.
Earlier, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the US Prince Khalid bin Salman, strongly denied the Washington Post story, and said he did not tell Khashoggi to go to Turkey, as the report claimed. 
“I never talked to him by phone and certainly never suggested he go to Turkey for any reason. I ask the US government to release any information regarding this claim,” Prince Khalid said
Khashoggi, a Saudi who lived in the United States, was a columnist for the Post.
He was killed on Oct. 2 at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul after he went to get marriage documents.