Mitsubishi expands oil leak recall to 1.7 million vehicles

Updated 19 December 2012
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Mitsubishi expands oil leak recall to 1.7 million vehicles

TOKYO: Mitsubishi Motors widened a recall over an oil leak issue on vehicles sold in Japan to about 1.7 million vehicles, prompting a rebuke from the country’s transport ministry.
The Japanese automaker had issued a recall two years ago for nearly 250,000 vehicles, adding about 300,000 more vehicles to the call back this year, after anonymous tips to the transport ministry prompted officials to order the firm to revisit the glitch.
Mitsubishi said yesterday it was adding another 1.2 million vehicles to the recall, the latest in a string of safety and quality issues to dent Japan’s auto sector.
A faulty engine part could trigger an oil leak and light the oil pressure gauge on the dashboard. In a worst case scenario the engine could seize, the company said, adding that no accidents had been linked to the glitch.
The latest recall covers eight Mitsubishi models produced between 1996 through 2004, the company said, adding that it would cost the firm about 7.5 billion yen ($ 89 million).
Mitsubishi’s announcement came a day after news that rival Toyota will pay a record $ 17.35 million fine for failing to promptly notify US authorities about a safety defect on 2010 Lexus models.
Japan’s transport ministry said it would meet Mitsubishi officials to press them on the issue, saying the company had not made sufficient announcements to the public.
It ordered the firm to report on the status of internal measures taken to prevent a recurrence of the problem, and said it would ask government-chosen experts to probe the recall.
Mitsubishi said it decided on the latest recall expansion because the firm had not yet been able to pin down exactly which vehicles would need repairs.
The transport ministry slap down comes a decade after Mitsubishi admitted to keeping the transport ministry and public in the dark about tens of thousands of complaints filed by car owners dating back to 1977.
There were some fatal accidents linked to the safety problems.
Toyota, Japan’s biggest automaker, last month announced a global recall of 2.77 million vehicles over water pump or steering problems, in the latest blow to the firm’s reputation after a spate of earlier call backs.
In October, it issued a huge global recall of 7.43 million vehicles, including its popular Camry and Corolla models, over a possible fire risk tied to a fault in its electric windows.
Rivals Honda and Nissan have also announced recalls in the past year.


Airbus warns could leave Britain if no Brexit deal

Updated 22 June 2018
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Airbus warns could leave Britain if no Brexit deal

  • Industry analysts say Airbus would be unlikely to pull out of the UK abruptly because of long lead times and waiting lists for its planes
  • Airbus, which makes wings for all its passenger jets in the UK, said that leaving both the EU’s single market and customs union immediately

PARIS: European aviation giant Airbus warned Thursday it could be forced to pull out of the UK if Britain leaves the European Union without a deal.
In a Brexit risk assessment, Airbus said Britain withdrawing from the EU without a deal “would lead to severe disruption and interruption of UK production.”
“This scenario would force Airbus to reconsider its investments in the UK, and its long-term footprint in the country, severely undermining UK efforts to keep a competitive and innovative aerospace industry, developing high value jobs and competences,” it warned.
“Put simply, a no deal scenario directly threatens Airbus’ future in the UK,” Tom Williams, chief operating officer of Airbus Commercial Aircraft, said in a statement.
In its risk assessment, Airbus said under a “no deal” scenario, delays and disruptions to its production could cost it up to one billion euros ($1.2 billion) a week in lost turnover.
It said a no-deal Brexit “would be catastrophic” for the aviation group.
Airbus employs 14,000 people at more than 25 sites in Britain, where it manufactures the wings of its aircraft.
“In any scenario, Brexit has severe negative consequences for the UK aerospace industry and Airbus in particular,” Williams said.
“While Airbus understands that the political process must go on, as a responsible business we require immediate details on the pragmatic steps that should be taken to operate competitively,” he said.
“Without these, Airbus believes that the impacts on our UK operations could be significant. We have sought to highlight our concerns over the past 12 months, without success.”
On the future trade relationship between Britain and the EU, Airbus said the current transition period, which runs until December 2020, “is too short for the EU and UK Governments to agree the outstanding issues, and too short for Airbus to implement the required changes with its extensive supply chain.”
“In this scenario, Airbus would carefully monitor any new investments in the UK and refrain from extending the UK suppliers/partners base.”
Britain is due to leave the European Union in March 2019 but continue the current trading arrangements during the transition phase to December 2020 to give time for the two sides to agree the terms of a new partnership.