More Indonesian mothers now turning to day care centers

Updated 08 November 2012
0

More Indonesian mothers now turning to day care centers

When Aryan Danudara was 6 months old and ended up in hospital because of poor care by the family maid, his parents decided to put him in a day care center after he recovered.
“Both my wife’s job and mine are very busy. So when he turned eight months old, we decided on sending him to day care,” said Adhi Ferdhya, a 40-year-old media consultant who said that between client visits and business trips, they were often away.
With more and more women going out to work due to rising education and middle-class aspirations, day care has become essential for residents of urban Jakarta and other parts of Indonesia, the way it has in the rest of the developed world.
But while earlier generations of the Indonesian middle class had the luxury of maids taking care of their children, rising education levels means women who once might have become maids or nannies prefer better jobs such as shopkeepers or factory workers, pushing wages higher.
Aryan, now 6, is still going to day care on weekdays from 7:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. The 2 million rupiah monthly fee ($210) covers daily care and three meals a day.
Others find that rising living costs and changing lifestyles make childcare a necessity, despite the still widespread belief that children should be taken care of at home, whether by a nanny, maid, grandparents or other relatives.
According to the Ministry of Education, the number of day care centers has doubled to 1,000 this year. But with demand rising sharply, this falls far short of the overall need.
Mustika Perwitasari, a 29-year-old mother of two including a newborn, lives with her mother-in-law for convenience but is considering day care.
“With two children, I have to go back to work otherwise we can’t afford to buy their milk. My mum isn’t young anymore, so two toddlers would be a handful,” she said.
“There’s a subsidized day care at my husband’s office, so we would try it for our older child.”
Keen Kids is a Jakarta-based private day care center, which currently running two facilities along with pre-school and elementary school. The private day care center has almost 200 children attending.
“These days both parents have to work for a living. Childcare is needed for children when both parents work. We are here to facilitate that need,” Melani Quintania, the headmistress of Keen Kids, told Reuters.
In some cases, parents opt for day care because they want their children to be in the hands of carers who are more qualified than a maid. Keen Kids keeps such a close eye on its charges that they are sometimes able to alert parents to learning disabilities or similar problems that might otherwise go undetected.
In addition, day care centers may be able to give children more stimulation than they would get at home, leading to additional benefits, said Vera Hadiwidjojo, a child psychologist at Klinik Terpadu Psikologi University of Indonesia. “With a good day care environment, the child will be more independent and can socialize easily,” she added.
But resistance remains strong for a variety of reasons, including the inconvenience of having a set pickup time for the children. Some parents also worry that the centers will be hotbeds of contagion, making their children ill.
“I’m not comfortable with putting my kids in day care,” said Siti Budi Wardhani, who works at the British Embassy and said she worries about the health of her two sons, age 7 and 9.
“Plus, they can be neglected because one person is handling several kids at one time.”


In emotional reunion, Spielberg revisits ‘Schindler’s List’

Updated 27 April 2018
0

In emotional reunion, Spielberg revisits ‘Schindler’s List’

  • It was the first time Steven Spielberg had watched “Schindler’s List” with an audience since it was released in 1993
  • Spielberg initially shied away from “Schindler’s List,” scripted by Steven Zaillian and based on Thomas Keneally’s novel “Schindler’s Arkansas”

NEW YORK: Steven Spielberg says no film has affected him the way “Schindler’s List” did.
Spielberg, Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley and others reunited for a 25th anniversary screening of “Schindler’s List” at the Tribeca Film Festival on Thursday, in an evening that had obvious meaning to Spielberg and the hushed, awed crowd that packed New York’s Beacon Theater. In a Q&A following the film, Spielberg said it was the first time he had watched “Schindler’s List” with an audience since it was released in 1993.
“I have never felt since ‘Schindler’s List’ the kind of pride and satisfaction and sense of real, meaningful accomplishment — I haven’t felt that in any film post-’Schindler’s List,’” Spielberg said.
The reunion was a chance for Spielberg and the cast to reflect on the singular experience of making an acknowledged masterwork that time has done little to dull the horror of, nor its necessity. “It feels like five years ago,” Spielberg said of making the film.
Spielberg shot the film in Krakow, Poland, in black-and-white and without storyboards, instead often using hand-held cameras to create a more documentary-like realism. Neeson remembered Spielberg running with a camera and, on the fly, directing him and Kingsley down Krakow streets. “It was exciting. It was dangerous and unforgettable,” Neeson said.
“Schindler’s List,” made for just $22 million (Spielberg declined a pay check), grossed $321 million worldwide and won seven Academy Awards, including best picture and best director. It also did much to educate the American public on the Holocaust. After the film, Spielberg established the Shoah Foundation, which took the testimony of 52,000 Holocaust survivors.
More needs to be done for Holocaust education, Spielberg said: “It’s not a pre-requisite to graduate high school, as it should be. It should be part of the social science, social studies curriculum in every public high school in this country.”
Making “Schindler’s List” was a profound, emotional and fraught experience for many of those involved. Kingsley recalled confronting a man for anti-Semitism during production. Spielberg said swastikas were sometimes painted overnight. Recreating scenes like those in the Krakow ghetto and at Auschwitz were, Spielberg said, very difficult for most of those involved. Two young Israeli actors, he said, had breakdowns after shooting a shower scene at the concentration camp.
“That aesthetic distance we always talk about between audience and experience? That was gone. And that was trauma,” said Spielberg. “There was trauma everywhere. And we captured the trauma. You can’t fake that. (The scene) where everyone takes off their clothes was probably the most traumatic day of my entire career — having to see what it meant to strip down to nothing and then completely imagine this could be your last day on earth.
“There were whole sections that go beyond anything I’ve ever experienced or seen people in front of the camera experience,” the 71-year-old filmmaker added.
Spielberg actually released two movies in 1993. “Jurassic Park” came out in June, and “Schindler’s List” followed in November. While he was shooting in Poland, Spielberg made several weekly satellite phone calls with the special effects house Industrial Light & Magic to go over Tyrannosaurus Rex shots — a distraction he abhorred.
“It built a tremendous amount of anger and resentment that I had to do this, that I actually had to go from what you experienced to dinosaurs chasing jeeps,” Spielberg told the audience. “I was very grateful later in June, though. But until then, it was a burden. This was all I cared about.”
“Schindler’s List” was a redefining film for Spielberg, who up until then was mostly considered an “entertainer,” associated with fantasy and escapism. Since, he has largely gravitated toward more dramatic and historical material like “Amistad,” “Saving Private Ryan,” “Munich,” “Lincoln” and last year’s “The Post.”
But Spielberg initially shied away from “Schindler’s List,” scripted by Steven Zaillian and based on Thomas Keneally’s novel “Schindler’s Arkansas”. He urged Roman Polanski, whose mother was killed at Auschwitz, to make it. Martin Scorsese was once attached to direct.
Yet the making of “Schindler’s List” prompted an awakening for Spielberg, who has said his “Jewish life came pouring back into my heart.” On Thursday, the director said he wanted to make the film about “the banality of the deepest evil” and “stay on the march to murder, itself.”
To keep his sanity while shooting in Poland, he watched “Saturday Night Live” on Betamax and relied on weekly calls from Robin Williams.
“He would call me on schedule and he would do 15 minutes of stand-up on the phone,” said Spielberg. “I would laugh hysterically because I had to release so much. But the way Robin is on the telephone, he would always hang up on you on the loudest, best laugh you’d give him.”