Morocco dismantles cell sending jihadists to Mali

Updated 24 November 2012
0

Morocco dismantles cell sending jihadists to Mali

RABAT: Morocco’s Interior Minister says that security forces have dismantled a militant cell sending young men to fight for organizations linked to Al-Qaeda in northern Mali.
The statement issued Saturday said the cell had inculcated more than 20 Moroccans with Al-Qaeda ideology and sent them to northern Mali after smuggling them across the closed border with Algeria.
Once in Mali they joined one of the two Al-Qaeda linked organizations operating in the north.
One man was caught trying to sneak back into Morocco to perform acts of sabotage, the statement added.
Morocco frequently announces dismantling small cells planning terrorist attacks inspired by Al-Qaeda, but the terror network is not believed to have a real presence in this North African kingdom of 32 million.


Tunisia reopens consulate in Libyan capital Tripoli

Updated 21 April 2018
0

Tunisia reopens consulate in Libyan capital Tripoli

  • Most embassies left Tripoli in 2014 when heavy fighting broke out between rival factions.
  • Only a few embassies came back when a UN-backed administration took office in 2016.

Tripoli: Tunisia has reopened its consulate in the Libyan capital, the Libya foreign ministry said on Saturday, the latest mission to return to Tripoli.
Most embassies left Tripoli in 2014 when heavy fighting broke out between rival factions and few came back when a UN-backed administration took office in 2016.
The Tunisian consulate resumed work after talks between the two countries, the Libyan foreign ministry said. The Tunisian foreign ministry declined to comment, but a diplomatic source confirmed the move.
Tunisian had closed its mission 2015 after ten staff were kidnapped.
In recent weeks some Western embassies have sent diplomats for longer stays to Tripoli as security has improved, although few stay full time on the ground.
The Italian and Turkish embassies as well as the UN mission are among the few open.
Tripoli is formally run by a Government of National Accord backed by the UN but in reality controlled by a patchwork of armed groups.
Big street clashes between rival groups have ended, but several rockets which hit Tripoli airport this week were a reminder that security remains shaky.
The UN has been trying to meditate to produce a national government and end the rift between the administration in Tripoli and a rival one in the east, part of a conflict gripping the oil producer since the toppling of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011.