Fines target Arab exotic cars in London

Updated 03 January 2016
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Fines target Arab exotic cars in London

LONDON: Millionaires living in London’s most affluent areas such as Knightsbridge and Chelsea have to be careful not to rev their exotic cars’ engines in the streets or face a fine of £1,000 ($1,500).
Most of those targeted are visitors from the Gulf region who bring their cars with them during their vacations.
The local council has introduced a Public Spaces Protection Order (PSPO) in Knightsbridge, London, to deal with the ‘excessive level of noise nuisance, annoyance, danger or risk or harm or injury’ caused by motorists.
The arrival of expensive Arab-owned supercars has become an annual event in London as rich Gulf visitors.
The nuisance peaks during summer but the fines are valid throughout the year.
Many bring with them their moderated vehicles, which for much of the time are parked outside luxury shops, five-star hotels and other exclusive streets around Knightsbridge.
Over the past few years, supercar enthusiasts from the UK and Middle-East have been accused of using the streets around Harrods as a playground for their driving antics.


Chevrolet goes after Jeep Grand Cherokee with new Blazer

The new Blazer sits relatively low to the ground and has futuristic creases on the sides and a low-angle windshield to give it a sporty look. (Courtesy of General Motors via AP)
Updated 22 June 2018
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Chevrolet goes after Jeep Grand Cherokee with new Blazer

  • GM on Thursday unveiled the sculpted Blazer in Atlanta
  • At its peak in 1996, Chevrolet sold just over 246,000 Blazers

DETROIT: Because these days you can’t have too many SUVs, General Motors is bringing back the Chevrolet Blazer.
Only this time it’s not a thirsty and boxy truck like its predecessor, one of the original SUVs that was sold from the 1982 through 2005 model years.
SUVs based on car underpinnings, sometimes called crossover vehicles, are what buyers want these days, and the Chevy brand didn’t have a midsize one with two rows of seats to compete with the popular Jeep Grand Cherokee, the Ford Edge and Nissan Murano.
So GM on Thursday unveiled the sculpted Blazer in Atlanta, trying to capitalize on a well-known name that has a lot of equity, said Steve Majoros, Chevy’s director of car and crossover marketing. “There’s still a number of people that either have good positive feelings about that product or still have them in their driveways,” he said.
At its peak in 1996, Chevrolet sold just over 246,000 Blazers.
The new Blazer is far from a box. It sits relatively low to the ground and has futuristic creases on the sides and a low-angle windshield to give it a sporty look. Chevy says it will come standard with a 193-horsepower, 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine, with an optional 305 horsepower 3.6-liter V6. All models will have stop-start technology that shuts off the engine at red traffic lights, plus nine-speed automatic transmissions that will help gas mileage.
Gas mileage and price weren’t released by GM. Chevy hopes to take a chunk out of Grand Cherokee sales, one of the more popular and profitable vehicles in the Jeep lineup, in the growing midsize SUV segment. Last year Fiat Chrysler sold nearly 159,000 Grand Cherokees.
The Blazer, due in showrooms early next year, comes as American buyers continue their shift from cars to trucks and SUVs. This year trucks and SUVs accounted for about two-thirds US new-vehicle sales, with cars making up the rest.