N. Korea ‘Hotel of Doom’ to open after long delays

Updated 03 November 2012
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N. Korea ‘Hotel of Doom’ to open after long delays

SEOUL: An enormous pyramid-shaped hotel which has stood half-built for decades in North Korea’s capital is on track to open its doors next year, a luxury international hotel chain said according to reports Friday.
Pyongyang’s 105-story Ryugyong Hotel, a monolithic concrete shell dubbed the “Hotel of Doom” by international media, has been repeatedly delayed and stands as a symbol of the economic problems plaguing the impoverished country. Despite doubts that it would ever be completed, the head of Geneva-based hotel group Kempinski AG has said it plans a partial launch next year, South Korean media said.
Seoul’s Korea JoongAng Daily quoted Kempinski chief executive Reto Wittwer as saying the group would open the hotel in July or August 2013, offering 150 rooms on the top floors of the building. “It will become a multipurpose complex, with the three lowest floors used for the lobby, restaurants and a shopping center, and the rest of the upper floors will be mostly used for offices,” he said.
South Korean daily Chosun Ilbo also quoted Wittwer as saying the Kempinski group planned to open the hotel in the first half of next year. Former North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il, who died last December, reportedly ordered construction of the hotel in 1987, with skills and capital from a French company.
In 2008 the project was named the ‘Worst Building in the History of Mankind’ by US men’s lifestyle magazine Esquire.


Ancient skeleton of child found in ruins of Pompeii's bath

Updated 25 April 2018
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Ancient skeleton of child found in ruins of Pompeii's bath

ROME (AP) — Work at ancient thermal baths in Pompeii's ruins has revealed the skeleton of a crouching child who perished in Mount Vesuvius' eruption in AD 79.
Pompeii's director Massimo Osanna said in a statement Wednesday that the skeleton, believed to be of a 7- or 8-year-old child, was found during work in February to shore up the main ancient baths in the sprawling archaeological site. The skeleton was removed on Tuesday from the baths' area for study, including DNA testing to determine the sex.
Osanna said it appears the skeleton might have been first spotted during a 19th-century excavation of the area, since the leg bones were orderly placed near the pelvis, but, for reasons unclear, wasn't removed by those earlier archaeologists.
Experts think deadly volcanic gases killed the child.