New Maserati Quattroporte: Italian designed high-performance sports luxury sedan

Updated 29 November 2012
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New Maserati Quattroporte: Italian designed high-performance sports luxury sedan

Maserati stands today at the edge of an unparalleled strategic and industrial growth that will see our presence in the world rise to 50,000 units a year by 2015. This growth is a challenge for which Maserati has carefully prepared itself.
 It is a growth based on those values of style, elegance, quality and performance for which Maserati has been always recognized and praised in almost 100 years of history. This exciting progression will make the new Maserati a true global player with two new production sites in two different continents and a heart solidly planted in Modena, Italy, where its roots are.
It is a growth that will be based on three new models entering two new segments of the automobile market — and it starts with the all-new 2013 Maserati Quattroporte.”
The new Maserati Quattroporte is a high-performance sports luxury sedan that reinterprets the design features of classic Maseratis in a contemporary design language. Its style was born out of the guiding design principles of Maserati — harmony of shapes, dynamism of lines, Italian elegance. More generous in size when compared to the previous model, the new Quattroporte has a design that is at once graceful and sinuous, and fashioned to bring out the sporty nature of the car.
Some of the elements characterizing the previous model have been purposely maintained: the front grill, the three side vents, and the triangular C pillar.
At the same time new style and functional features were introduced - the strong belt line that runs through the entire side of the car giving the new Quattroporte a look and feel
That’s at once muscular and elegant, the new front and rear lights, the three frameless side glasses.
Inside, the design of the Quattroporte aims at essentiality, stressing the simplicity of lines and the full functionality of the in-board instrumentation. Functional elements are blended with soft quality surfaces made of prestigious woods and refined leathers.”
Lorenzo Ramaciotti, head of Maserati Design Center, speaking about Maserati Quattroporte’s all-new next generation powertrain, says: “The innovative Maserati proprietary engines of the all-new Maserati Quattroporte have all been designed and developed by Maserati and Ferrari engineers in the heart of Italy’s motor valley. As a matter of fact, they are going to be produced in the Ferrari plant in Maranello that has been synonymous with cutting-edge technology and passion for well over 60 years.”
“Passion is indeed the middle name of a whole new generation of Maserati engines that will equip the all-new Maserati Quattroporte and the models that will soon follow on the market. The passion and state-of-the-art technology that is at the heart of all the new Maserati engines that will be mounted on the next generation of Maserati products have produced engines that are not only more powerful than ever, or more exciting to drive than ever – but also more eco-friendly than ever before,” he added.
Paolo Martinelli, Maserati Powertrain director, explaining Maserati Quattroporte’s key technical features, says: “Refined technical solutions, an explicit attention to the most challenging targets in terms of performance, comfort, efficiency and safety – these are the key elements of the all-new Maserati Quattroporte. Maserati engineers have worked with a competence matched only by their passion in chassis designing and engineering, weight reduction, and ergonomic enhancement to develop a car capable of fitting different
powertrain architectures and transmission configurations for the most diverse driving conditions but always maintaining Maserati’s trademark best-in-class driving comfort.”
The result is the all-new Maserati Quattroporte, a luxury sports sedan that reaches new heights in terms of performance and handling, driving enjoyment as well as respect of the world we live in - the best performance ever in the long history of Maserati’s four-door flagship sedan are matched by the unprecedented success in the quest for an eco-friendly automobile. All this done, of course, as expected from Maserati in the spirit of the most severe active and passive safety conditions.”


Nigeria sees a rush to get Nollywood online

Updated 20 June 2018
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Nigeria sees a rush to get Nollywood online

  • Nollywood is home to the world’s second biggest movie industry in terms of production behind Hindi-language Bollywood.
  • A viable economic model for the promoters of Nollywood online still needs to be found, given the lack of widespread high-speed Internet coverage

LAGOS, Nigeria: A glamor blogger, a filmmaker and a tech mogul are competing to create a homegrown African rival to Netflix, but poor Internet connections and intense competition are proving daunting obstacles.
They dream of popularizing access to films made in Nigeria, which is home to the world’s second biggest movie industry in terms of production behind Hindi-language Bollywood.
With nearly $4 billion in revenue and almost 2,000 productions every year, films made in what is known as Nollywood are largely sold on the streets and to idling motorists caught in traffic as pirated copies for just a few dollars.
Local start-ups and Nollywood stars understand the interest in changing the distribution of films that are hugely popular across Africa, where cinemas are few and far between.
With such a huge potential market, video-on-demand platforms have sprung up in Lagos, Nigeria’s commercial capital and home to the country’s film industry.
And competition is already fierce.
Blogger Linda Ikeji — one of Nigeria’s biggest names on social networks — recently launched Linda Ikeji TV (LITV) to great fanfare.
It offers dozens of films, series and programs inspired by US shows but with a Nollywood twist for a monthly fee of 1,000 naira ($2.80).
“We are hoping to be to Africa what Netflix is to the world,” Ikeji wrote on her Instagram page, which has some two million followers.
She promised glamor, sass and humor, particularly with reality shows such as “Football Wives” or “Highway Girls of Eko,” “a show on real-life prostitutes” in Lagos.
The 37-year-old former model-turned-businesswoman made her fortune through advertising revenue on her site, which tracked the lives of Nigeria’s rich and famous.
She said she had invested “half-a-billion naira” of capital in the project. As well as buying video, she is also making original content from her own studios in Lagos.
Before the end of the year, Nigerian company Envivo is expected to launch its own platform with an initial investment of more than $20 million, said filmmaker Chioma Ude, who is the firm’s marketing director.
“(US telecoms giant) Cisco wants a big footprint in Africa, and as our technical partner, they will provide all the technology, from the network to the video compressions, etc.,” the founder of the Africa International Film Festival said.
A viable economic model for the promoters of Nollywood online still needs to be found, given the lack of widespread high-speed Internet coverage.
Only 34 percent of Africans have Internet access compared with more than 50 percent in the rest of the world, according to the 2018 Global Digital report.
But Africa showed the biggest progression in Internet users last year, especially through mobile telephones.
Serge Noukoue, organizer of the annual Nollywood Week in Paris, said price was everything and the African consumer wanted to pay “as little as possible” to watch a film.
“Even iROKOtv, the pioneer on the continent, doesn’t really make a profit,” he said.
“They have had a lot of success in fundraising but what subscribers actually bring in is less conclusive.”
Jason Njoku founded iROKOtv in 2010 but said he made a mistake to count on streaming from the start. “It simply couldn’t work,” he explained.
“Data costs were prohibitive, as is access to reliable broadband across huge swathes of the continent. Our customer service team was inundated with queries.
“We totally rebuilt our product and rebuilt our entire company around the African consumer and their habits.”
That led to an application that ate less data and which allows free mobile downloads of video files.
There is original content, while films have also been subtitled in French, Swahili and Zulu to make them more accessible to other African countries.
Competitors have emerged elsewhere in Africa in recent years, including Kenya’s BuniTV ($5-a-month) or South Africa’s Magic Go ($8-a-month).
“If these online platforms don’t make money yet they’re a bet on the future for when connections are better,” said Noukoue.
“A lot of projects have been created but there will not be room for everyone in the market in the long term. Competition will be fierce.”
Giants of the sector such as Netflix, which in 2016 launched in Africa, could outshine the continent’s video-on-demand pioneers in years to come.
“Netflix doesn’t yet have a real Africa strategy but it’s started to produce original African content. That will be a gamechanger.
“It has considerable means at its disposal that the others don’t have.”