Ford slashes CEO’s pay

Updated 16 March 2013
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Ford slashes CEO’s pay

DEARBORN, Michigan: Ford Motor Co slashed the 2012 compensation of its chief executive officer by 29 percent, in part because the No. 2 US automaker missed some key goals for market share, profit and cash flow, the company said.
Alan Mulally, who has led Ford since 2006, received $ 2 million in salary and nearly $ 4 million in cash bonuses, Ford said in its preliminary proxy filing. His overall pay was $ 21 million, including stock awards, options and other perks. That compares with an overall package of $ 29.5 million in 2011. This included a one-time restricted stock grant, worth $ 8 million at the time, for the CEO’s role in reducing the number of Ford’s vehicle platforms, a move that could cut costs and complexity.
“We believe our 2012 performance clearly shows our management team performed exceedingly well in a difficult environment,” Ford said in its proxy statement. Mulally, 67, is credited with spearheading Ford’s turnaround by mortgaging the automaker’s assets, including the Blue Oval logo, and executing his “One Ford” strategy to cut costs.
Ford beat its goals for cost controls and quality last year, but fell short of its benchmarks for profit and cash flow, two areas of heavy focus. In 2012, Ford met about 75 percent of its performance targets, Ford said in its proxy.
Ford’s pretax profit was $ 8 billion, lower than the $8.7 billion aim. Its global automotive operating-related cash flow was $ 3.4 billion, less than the desired $ 4.6 billion.
Ford said it met only 3 percent of its market-share target.


Is the Dubai economy turning the corner?

Updated 1 min 4 sec ago
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Is the Dubai economy turning the corner?

  • Expo 2020 expected to boost GDP
  • Relaxation of residency rules helps real estate

LONDON: Is the Dubai economy finally turning the corner? At least one major international bank thinks so.

It follows a move by the emirate's leadership to reboot an economy that has been hit hard by corporate job losses, the introduction of VAT and a slowing real estate sector.

The UAE’s non-oil economy is likely to “turn a corner” next year with Dubai’s Expo 2020 infrastructure projects, changes to visa rules and increased government spending set to boost growth, according to a Bank of America Merrill Lynch (BofAML) research note.

Abu Dhabi National Oil Company’s (ADNOC) downstream expansion plans are also expected to drive the country’s non-oil GDP growth, said the note compiled by Middle East and North Africa (MENA) economist Jean Michel Saliba.

The Gulf country’s real GDP growth is estimated to rise to 3.5 percent in 2019 from a forecast 2.8 percent increase this year and a 1.9 percent increase in 2017, said the note published on Thursday.

Buoyed by a recovery in oil prices, Abu Dhabi approved a 50 billion dirham ($13.6 billion) three-year stimulus package in early June, which BofAML estimated could add 0.4 percentage points to non-oil GDP growth.

ADNOC’s $45 billion five-year downstream investment plan — revealed in May — is estimated to add a further 1.1 percentage point to the emirate’s non-oil growth, the report said.

The Expo 2020 event in Dubai could drive up GDP growth by 2 percentage points between 2020 and 2021, the report said, by boosting job creation, consumption and tourist numbers.

Given the improvement in oil prices, the cost of Abu Dhabi’s stimulus spending is considered “financeable” by BofAML, while Dubai’s spending plans are said to be “modest.”

Recent structural reforms, including plans to introduce long-term expatriate visas for up to 10 years, could help to boost the UAE’s population and consumer demand, the note said.

“The new UAE long-term and temporary visa system should facilitate retention of white-collar expatriates,” it said.

“As we expect longer-term visas not to be linked to continued employment, this may increase expatriate incentives to acquire property and support real estate demand.”

The UAE announced in May that it would allow 100 percent foreign ownership of UAE companies in specific industries by the end of the year, a move that could give a welcome boost to foreign direct investment in the country.

A new UAE-wide insurance scheme may provide a one-time boost to corporate profits, the note said.

The UAE cabinet approved plans in June for the insurance scheme to replace the previous system whereby employers had to provide a monetary guarantee to cover each of their workforce.

The move is likely to free up capital that companies could choose to sit on or to reinvest, BofAML said.

“Should corporates invest, we estimate this could lead to a one-off 0.1percentage point boost to UAE non-hydrocarbon real GDP growth,” the report said.