Indian expats explore higher education options in Saudi Arabia

Updated 27 March 2013
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Indian expats explore higher education options in Saudi Arabia

Students and parents have strongly urged the Indian mission to explore options for opening higher education avenues for Indian expatriate students with Saudi authorities.
Apart from students and parents, a large number of working professionals explored the options of various short-term, long-distance intensive courses to enhance their skills and expertise at the Higher Education Fair & Career Guidance Program organized by the Indian Youth Welfare Association (IYWA) recently at Consulate General of India in Jeddah.
Universities, institutions and educational academies from India, Saudi Arabia and GCC countries participated in the Higher Education Fair to introduce and promote their new courses and institutions. Experts from various streams in education sector provided career guidance to students about the new courses and their opportunities, existing courses and their demand, in addition to options available in vocational, diploma and certificate courses in their respective fields. Academicians, professors, lecturers and principals from various colleges and schools graced the occasion.
Guidance in computer science was given by Professor R. Selvarani and Sara Fatima, lecturers in the Information Systems Department at the Faculty of Computing and Information Technology at King Abdul Aziz University in Jeddah, while Khalid Hassan, accounts manager at Abdul Latif Jameel (ALJ), gave a lecture on commerce.
Teachers from International Indian School Jeddah (IISJ) provided guidance to the students. Fruitful information on technology was given by Abdul Hamid, geography by Mohan Raj, engineering and scholarships by Thomas M. Das Arackal, economics by Mohammad Imran, biology and medical sciences by Dr. Iftekhar H. Javeed, humanities by Ashraf Unnisa, home science by Zehra Mahruq, and sports by Vijender Singh and Ranjit Kaur.
Chief guest Faiz Ahmed Kidwai, consul general of India, inaugurated the Higher Education Fair & Career Guidance Program. Mohammed Raghib Qureshi, head of chancery and consul (education), Pranav Ganesh, consul (consular); S.R.H. Fahmi, consul (community welfare) and Prabhat Jain, consul (labor). IISJ Principal Masood Ahmad also attended the event.
Both academicians and educationalists were praised by IYWA for taking up the cause of higher education and professional development and creating awareness among the community. They were impressed by the large turnout and the magnitude of response, interest and inquisitiveness of students and parents for the future of their career and professional path and concluded that the program was unique and first of its kind in their decades of stay in Jeddah.


Saudi Arabia pushes back launch of ‘entertainment city’

Updated 5 min 39 sec ago
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Saudi Arabia pushes back launch of ‘entertainment city’

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia on Tuesday said it has delayed by three days the launch of an “entertainment city” near Riyadh, part of a series of multi-billion dollar projects as the oil-reliant Kingdom seeks to diversify.
King Salman had been scheduled on Wednesday to launch construction of the 334-square kilometer project in Qiddiya, southwest of Riyadh, touted as the Kingdom’s answer to Disneyland.
“King Salman will inaugurate next Saturday the Qiddiya project, which is the new entertainment, sports and cultural destination in the Kingdom,” the state-run Saudi Press Agency said, without explaining the delay.
Construction for the first phase of development, which would include high-end theme parks, motor sport facilities and a safari area, is expected to be completed in 2022, officials say.
The facility highlights a “relentless effort to develop giga-projects that will help achieve many direct and indirect economic returns,” project official Fahd bin Abdullah Tounsi was quoted as saying in a government statement on Monday.
Qiddiya chief executive Michael Reininger has said the project in the entertainment-starved Kingdom is expected to draw foreign investment, but gave no figures.
Saudi Arabia has dazzled investors with plans for three hi-tech “giga projects,” funded in part by its sovereign wealth fund, but skeptics question their viability.
Aside from Qiddiya, the Kingdom has unveiled blueprints to build NEOM, a mega project billed as a regional Silicon Valley, in addition to the Red Sea project, a reef-fringed resort destination — both worth hundreds of billions of dollars.
Such projects are the brainchild of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, architect of a sweeping reform program dubbed “Vision 2030.”
The reforms stem partly from a motive to boost domestic spending on entertainment as the Kingdom has been reeling from an oil slump since 2014.
Saudis currently splurge billions of dollars annually to see films and visit amusement parks in neighboring tourist hubs like Dubai and Bahrain.
In February, Saudi Arabia’s General Entertainment Authority said it would stage more than 5,000 festivals and concerts in 2018, double the number of last year, and pump $64 billion in the sector in the coming decade.