Prince Badr mourned

Updated 05 April 2013
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Prince Badr mourned

 

Prince Badr bin Abdul Aziz, former deputy commander of the National Guard, died yesterday, the Royal Court said in an announcement. He was 81.
Funeral prayer for the late prince will be conducted at Imam Turki bin Abdullah Mosque in Riyadh after Asr prayer today, it added.
The Council of Ministers conveyed its condolences to Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah, Crown Prince Salman, deputy premier and minister of defense, and the royal family over Prince Badr’s death.
Born in 1932 in Riyadh, Prince Badr was the 20th son of King Abdul Aziz, the founder of Saudi Arabia. He grew up under the special care of his father and had his education in Riyadh. He had taken part in Saudi delegations that visited different countries and attended international events.
He had accompanied King Faisal during his visits to Arab and Islamic countries.
He was appointed minister of communications in 1961 and deputy commander of the National Guard in 1967. He had played an important role in the development of the National Guard.
Prince Badr was involved in various cultural and sports activities. He was chairman of the higher organizing committee for Janadriya Heritage and Culture Festival and chairman of the Equestrian Club.


Green light for crown prince-led Saudi privatization program

Updated 25 April 2018
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Green light for crown prince-led Saudi privatization program

  • The Privatization Program is one of 12 key elements of the Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030
  • The program is aimed at increasing job opportunities for Saudi nationals

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s Council of Economic and Development Affairs on Tuesday approved the Privatization Program that is one of 12 key elements of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030. 

The program is aimed at increasing job opportunities for Saudi nationals, attracting the latest technologies and innovations, and supporting economic development.

It encourages both local and foreign investment in order to enhance the role of the private sector, with government entities adopting a regulatory and supervisory role. The aim is to increase the private sector’s contribution to GDP from 40 percent to 65 percent by 2030. 

The program will aim to reach its objectives through encouraging the private sector to invest in establishing new schools, universities and health centers, while the government pursues its organizational and supervisory role in health and education.

The privatization program aims to benefit from previous success stories, with the private sector’s collaboration in the development of infrastructure, and its involvement on a large scale in sectors such as energy, water, transport, telecommunications, petrochemicals and finance.

The program sets out a series of objectives in three areas: Developing a general legal framework for policies related to privatization; establishing organizational foundations and dedicated institutions to execute the policies; and setting a timescale for their delivery. 

The Council of Economic and Development Affairs is headed by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.