Facebook spoiling 78% of Saudi secondary students

Updated 16 April 2013
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Facebook spoiling 78% of Saudi secondary students

Facebook had a negative effect on the academic performance of 78 percent of Saudi secondary school students, said a recent survey conducted by Musaed bin Hamdan Al-Sharari, a Saudi student of Jordan’s Yarmouk University.
“About 67 percent of Saudi students do not use Facebook for academic purposes,” said the study by Al-Sharari, a postgraduate student of the university’s Faculty of Information.
Most Saudi students use Facebook to spend their free time and chat with their friends. “About 57 percent of secondary schools in the Kingdom do not have their pages on the Facebook,” the study pointed out.
The survey, which was conducted on 400 students in public and private schools in Riyadh, found that many of them had acquainted with bad friends and used to see ugly photos and videos during the time of exams. “This had a negative effect on their academic results,” Al-Sharari said and emphasized the need for educating children on how to use social media in an effective and useful manner.
Meanwhile, the Communications and Information Technology Commission said yesterday that it has approved a number of roaming packages that would be suitable to Saudis studying abroad and their dependents as well as families who spend their vacations in foreign countries. “We hope this will encourage companies to reduce their prices for local calls by offering discounted packages and to invest more to improve the quality of services.”
The CITC said it had noticed in the past the flight of millions of cell phone chips to outside the Kingdom and were used to receive international calls free of charge by individuals and businesses.


Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

Updated 17 April 2018
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Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

  • Previous research has shown a new blood test has potential to detect eight different kinds of tumors before they spread
  • The research starts in April and will run until September

TOKYO: A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.
Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.
It will now begin testing the method using some 250 urine samples, to see if samples at room temperature are suitable for analysis, Hitachi spokesman Chiharu Odaira told AFP.
“If this method is put to practical use, it will be a lot easier for people to get a cancer test, as there will be no need to go to a medical organization for a blood test,” he said.
It is also intended to be used to detect paediatric cancers.
“That will be especially beneficial in testing for small children” who are often afraid of needles, added Odaira.
Research published earlier this year demonstrated that a new blood test has shown promise toward detecting eight different kinds of tumors before they spread elsewhere in the body.
Usual diagnostic methods for breast cancer consist of a mammogram followed by a biopsy if a risk is detected.
For colon cancer, screening is generally conducted via a stool test and a colonoscopy for patients at high risk.
The Hitachi technology centers around detecting waste materials inside urine samples that act as a “biomarker” — a naturally occurring substance by which a particular disease can be identified, the company said in a statement.
The procedure aims to improve the early detection of cancer, saving lives and reducing the medical and social cost to the country, Odaira explained.
The experiment will start this month until through September in cooperation with Nagoya University in central Japan.
“We aim to put the technology in use in the 2020s, although this depends on various things such as getting approval from the authorities,” Odaira said.