Geely’s Emgrand X7 SUV set to enter Saudi market

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Updated 18 April 2013
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Geely’s Emgrand X7 SUV set to enter Saudi market

Haji Husein Alireza & Co. Ltd. is gearing up to launch Chinese auto manufacturer Geely’s first SUV Emgrand X7 model into the Saudi market in June.
Husam Al-Hanbali, general manager — sales and marketing at Haji Husein Alireza & Co., while visiting the Geely’s Chengdu SUV assembly plant with the media group from Saudi Arabia, told Arab News that Geely’s line of new models are very popular in Saudi Arabia.
“After the successful Emgrand X7’s launch in China last year, it is coming to Saudi Arabia for the first time,” Al-Hanbali said.
He said four Geely models — LC Panda, GX2, EC7 and EC8 — have already been launched in Saudi Arabia since September 2011.
“We launched Geely cars into the Saudi market when prices of other Japanese cars were very high. We provided right products with equivalent Japanese technology at the right time,” he added.
He said sales of Geely vehicles were very satisfactory in the first year after their launch.
Al-Hanbali said Haji Husein Alireza & Co., the sole distributor of Geely vehicles across the Kingdom, sold 13,000 Geely vehicles in Saudi Arabia and took the market share of 1.7 percent in 2012.
“Our expectations are high this year after the launch of Emgrand X7 SUV model in June. We are targeting to sell 18,000 vehicles this year in the Saudi market and take the market share of over two percent,” he added.
“Last year it ranked No. 8 among car distributors in Saudi Arabia, but this year our aim is to rank No. 7,” he stressed.
“Our distribution network is excellent in the Kingdom,” he said.
“We have 20 branches throughout the Kingdom and our aim is to open four more branches in Jeddah, Taif, Hofuf and Jubail,” he added.
Haijing Hou, group vice president of Zhejiang Geely Holding Group. Co. Ltd. and general manager of Geely’s Chengdu SUV assembly plant, said the production capacity at present is about 80,000 units at this plant annually because it is working in one shift.
But Hou, who joined the company last April, said: “We will launch another night shift soon, so the production capacity will double to 160,000 units per year. So from present 250 cars per day, the production will increase to 500 cars daily.”
“Because of huge demand in China, we sell about 85 percent of our vehicles in the domestic market and 15 percent overseas,” Hou added.
But he said: “We are aiming for half and half. So we will sell half of vehicles in the domestic market and half overseas in future.”
Earlier, Leon Chang, project manager at Geely International Corporation, gave a briefing to visiting Saudi delegation about the Geely Chengdu plant, which is located in the economic and technological development zone in east Chengdu, Sichuan Province.
He said the plant was registered in October 2007 with capital of 50 million yuan.
The first stage construction started in February 2009 and completed in the same year at the same time, the plant successfully started producing Geely’s first SUV model.
Chang said at present the plant had built up automobile production lines that composed of four automobile manufacturing processes which are pressing, welding, painting and assembling and a wide range of supporting facilities.
The first SUV model GX7 was launched at Beijing auto show in April 2012.
GX7 was designed by the globally renowned car designer Giorgetto Giugiaro.
He said, in July 2012, Geely Chengdu plant was granted the title of “Safety Culture Construction Model enterprise” by Chengdu government.
It was also awarded as the “Innovative Enterprise” in the 18th Chinese machinery manufacturing industry management modernization competition.


Pompeo says China is engaging in ‘predatory economics 101’

Would China have allowed America to do to it what China has done to America asked US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. (AP)
Updated 18 June 2018
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Pompeo says China is engaging in ‘predatory economics 101’

  • He said China’s recent claims of “openness and globalization” are “a joke.”

DETROIT: China is engaging in “predatory economics 101” and an “unprecedented level of larceny” of intellectual property, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told a business audience Monday.
Pompeo made the remarks at the Detroit Economic Club as global markets reacted to trade tensions between the US and China. Both nations started putting trade tariffs in motion that are set to take effect July 6.
He said China’s recent claims of “openness and globalization” are “a joke.” He added that China is a “predatory economic government” that is “long overdue in being tackled,” matters that include IP theft and Chinese steel and aluminum flooding the US market.
“Everyone knows ... China is the main perpetrator,” he said. “It’s an unprecedented level of larceny.”
“Just ask yourself: Would China have allowed America to do to it what China has done to America?” he said later. “This is predatory economics 101.”
The Chinese Embassy in Washington did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Pompeo raised the trade issue directly with China last week, when he met in Beijing with President Xi Jinping and others.
“I reminded him that’s not fair competition,” Pompeo said.
President Donald Trump has announced a 25 percent tariff on up to $50 billion in Chinese imports. China is retaliating by raising import duties on $34 billion worth of American goods, including soybeans, electric cars and whiskey. Trump also has slapped tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada, Mexico and European allies.
Wall Street has viewed the escalating trade tensions with wariness, fearful they could strangle the economic growth achieved during Trump’s watch. Gary Cohn, Trump’s former top economic adviser, said last week that a “tariff battle” could result in price inflation and consumer debt — “historic ingredients for an economic slowdown.”
Pompeo on Monday described US actions as “economic diplomacy,” which, when done right, strengthens national security and international alliances, he added.
“We use American power, economic might and influence as a tool of economic policy,” he said. “We do our best to call out unfair economic behaviors as well.”