Pakistan: More than 12,000 affected by quake

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Updated 18 April 2013
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Pakistan: More than 12,000 affected by quake

MASHKAIL, Pakistan: More than 12,000 Pakistanis living in a remote, impoverished southwestern desert region near the Iranian border have been affected by this week’s huge earthquake, a relief official said on Thursday.
The 7.8-magnitude quake, centerd in southeastern Iran on Tuesday was the Islamic republic’s most powerful in five decades and killed 41 people — all but one of them were in Pakistan.
In Pakistan the worst-affected area has been Mashkeel, in Baluchistan, where the lack of paved roads, electricity, mobile phone coverage and medical facilities have hampered the rescue effort.
“We have done a rapid survey and found that over 12,000 people have been affected by the quake in Mashkail,” said Mehboob Ali, a district coordinator for the Balochistan Rural Support Program charity.
He said more than 3,200 homes, made mostly of mud, were either damaged or no longer habitable, forcing people to sleep out in the open or in makeshift shelters for a third night.
The military on Thursday continued to fly in medicine and tents, but more supplies are desperately needed, said local official Syed Mureed Shah.
“There’s growing impatience among the people affected by the quake as they are not receiving relief goods,” Shah said.
Rauf Jamal Dini, an official with Quetta-based charity Sahar, also called urgently for more supplies, saying neither the military nor government authorities had been seen in areas visited by his aid workers.
“People are making complaints. They are in dire need of relief goods. We are conducting a rapid survey to assess the damage,” he said.
But military and civilian officials said they were doing what they could.
Sohail Islam, a district health official, said four doctors and 10 paramedics on the ground had treated around 170 injured people since Wednesday.
“Most of the people have fractures and other injuries to limbs, and most are women and children. The seriously injured have been shifted to (provincial capital) Quetta while rest have been sent home,” he said.
Captain Shoaib Elahi from the Frontier Corps paramilitary said troops had treated 85 injured people in Mashkail, most of them women and children.
“Now they have moved to their houses. We have only two beds in an FC, mud-built health facility and only have two patients in the facility, a woman and an elderly man, whose beds are in open space,” he said.
Baluchistan, which also borders Afghanistan, is plagued by Islamist militancy, attacks on the Shiite Muslim minority and a separatist Baluch insurgency.


Pence quashes Trump rift reports

Updated 17 November 2018
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Pence quashes Trump rift reports

  • Pence told reporters in Port Moresby that they had still had a good rapport, despite a previous report from The New York Times
  • The New York Times said Trump has taken to asking several advisers whether the vice president is loyal

PORT MORESBY: US Vice President Mike Pence on Saturday dismissed reports of a rift with his boss President Donald Trump, saying the pair laughed about the suggestion in a phone call.
Following a New York Times report that suggested Trump was privately questioning the loyalty of his deputy, Pence told reporters in Port Moresby that they had still had a good rapport.
“I’m just tempted not to dignified it with a comment,” he said after a pause, adding that the pair had spoken by phone and “it came up.”
“We had a good laugh,” said Pence. “We’ve got a very strong relationship.”
“I’ve been honored to serve as his vice president, I was honored when he asked me to run with him.”
The New York Times said Trump has taken to asking several advisers whether the vice president is loyal — which they say is usually a sign he has “grown irritated” with someone, according to the paper.
Trump has not openly suggested dropping Pence from the ticket with the 2020 presidential election rapidly approaching, the New York Times stressed.
But according to the paper, some advisers have suggested Trump could benefit from a running mate who would help him win support from women.