Capturing moments of consummate elegance — Salma Jammal style

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Updated 24 April 2013
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Capturing moments of consummate elegance — Salma Jammal style

Saudi wedding and portrait photographer Salma Jammal has been taking photographs for seven years. She has spent two years as a professional. She also teaches photographic courses in Jeddah. Salma is a college student and divides her time between her passion for photography, family and studies.
After seeing her work on social media websites, Arab News interviewed her about wedding photography, cameras and her future plans.

What attracted you to photography?
I've always been into art, I used to draw and sketch a lot before getting into photography. When I was searching an online art community, I was fascinated by how a photograph could be so meaningful and expressive. A great photograph can tell a story just like descriptive text. The saying is true that 'a picture is worth a thousand words.'

Did you study photography?
I'm 80 percent self-taught, but I took a couple of courses to get more knowledge from local and international photographers.

What type of cameras do you shoot with?
I shoot with Nikon full frame DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) cameras.

What kind of photography do you do?
I do weddings, engagements and portraits.

What are the pros and cons of being a photographer?
The pros of being a photographer for me is doing what I love and being passionate about it. I can't say it has cons but sometimes it gets hard when you deal with people who don't appreciate art.

What is your favorite kind of wedding photography, and what is it about weddings that interest you so much?
I love to do it in a documentary style mixed with romance and glamour. I became a wedding photographer because I wanted to capture the love and emotions involved. I also love everything about weddings!

How did you make the breakthrough to becoming a full-time photographer?
I've always wanted to have my business in photography, to work at something I'm passionate about. My husband supported me a lot every step of the way.

What kind of equipment do you use now and what did you start with?
When I first started photography my equipment was a camera and sunlight, but now I use studio lights sometimes when shooting a wedding, or sunlight if the wedding takes place early.

What is the one lasting impression you want to leave with your photos?
To see a smile on their faces when they see the pictures that is an eternal memory of every detail of their wedding.

How long have you been a photographer?
It's been almost two years since I started my business.

What is your most used Photoshop tool?
That's a hard one! I guess I use Clone Stamp the most, and color balance of course.

What is your dream location to shoot a wedding?
A beach wedding with the perfect weather and the bride and groom walking barefoot on the sand beside the ocean.

If you could shoot any celebrity wedding, who would be the lucky couple?
Anne Hathaway and Adam Shulman would have been my first favorite because I loved her dress and the location was beautiful. My second choice would have been Justin Timberlake and Jessica Biel.

What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learned and what advice do you have for new wedding photographers?
A wedding photographer should always be safe and back up everything, just in case! Also, be relaxed, organized and flexible at the same time.

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West End theater turns migrant camp to get London audience talking

Updated 20 June 2018
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West End theater turns migrant camp to get London audience talking

  • The Playhouse Theatre in London’s West End aims to immerse the audience in the squalid camp in the northern French port city of Calais that inspired “The Jungle.”
  • The immersive play offers a glimpse into life in the camp, telling the story of asylum-seekers, people smugglers and charity workers who used to populate it.

LONDON: London theatergoers used to spectating in comfort are in for a rude awakening after the authors of a play swapped the traditional plush velvet seating for wooden benches and covered the floor with soil to simulate the feel of a migrant camp.
The Playhouse Theatre in London’s West End aims to immerse the audience in the squalid camp in the northern French port city of Calais that inspired “The Jungle,” whose authors hope their play will stoke debate about migration.
“People often hold strong opinions about this subject because it doesn’t seem to have any immediate answer,” said Joe Murphy, 27, who co-wrote the play.
“Discussion is the only think that is going to get us forward ... and hopefully this play can provide some of that space for debate,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in an interview.
Co-author Joe Robertson said the pair had “tried to depict both the terrible conditions that existed in the Jungle camp, but also the hope that existed in that place.”
Up to 10,000 people seeking ways to reach Britain used to live in the giant slum before it was cleared by authorities in late 2016.
Immigration remains a major political issue across Europe, as well as in the United States, where the Trump administration’s policy of separating migrant families at the Mexican border has caused an international outcry.
Several European leaders including those of France, Germany, Italy and Austria are to hold talks on Sunday to explore how to stop people from moving around the European Union after claiming asylum in one of the Mediterranean states of arrival.
Murphy and Robertson, 28, based the script on their experience as volunteers in Calais, where they ran a temporary theater within the camp.
The immersive play offers a glimpse into life in the camp, telling the story of asylum-seekers, people smugglers and charity workers who used to populate it.
“There were 25 different nationalities of people all forced to live side by side often on top of each other and the phenomenal story about that place was people did make an effort to come together,” said Robertson.
Theatre-goers are invited to seat at the tables of the camp’s makeshift Afghan café, where the action unfolds.
“The closer you are to the audience the better the message is delivered,” said actor Ammar Hajj Ahmad, who plays one of the leading characters.
Ahmad, from Syria, is one of many actors from a refugee background featured in the play. Several asylum-seekers the authors met in Calais are also part of the cast.
“I am proud of this, I love telling stories ... about the many people who lived in Calais,” said cast-member Mohamed Sarrar, a musician from Sudan who arrived in Britain two years ago.
The play, which premiered at another London theater The Young Vic, last year, runs from July 5 to November.