Nokia wins ban on HTC One component

Updated 24 April 2013
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Nokia wins ban on HTC One component

HELSINKI: Nokia Oyj said it won a court injunction that would prevent rival HTC Corp. from using microphone components made by STMicroelectronics NV in HTC One phones.
The Finnish phone maker said in a statement announcing the decision by the Amsterdam District Court that the microphone components were invented by Nokia and manufactured exclusively for Nokia phones.
“HTC has no license or authorization from Nokia to use these microphones or the Nokia technologies from which they have been developed,” Nokia said.
It said the injunction was effective until March 2014 and would prevent ST Micro from selling the components to Taiwan’s HTC globally.
Such a decision could create further headaches for HTC, which has already struggled with component shortages for its flagship HTC One smartphone.
HTC said it was disappointed with the decision.
“We are considering whether it will have any impact on our business and we will explore alternative solutions immediately,” HTC said in an e-mailed statement.
Nokia, which makes the Lumia line of smartphones based on Microsoft Corp. software, and HTC, which uses Google Inc. software, have both been scrambling to regain ground lost to bigger rivals Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. and Apple Inc. in the global smartphone market.
Nokia said the technology in question is “high amplitude audio capture” and enables high-quality recording of music from mobile phones. Nokia said it took apart the HTC One to confirm the microphone, which HTC called “dual membrane HDR,” was the same as its own.

In addition to the latest case, Nokia has filed about 40 patent infringement cases against HTC.
Nokia’s US shares were up 10 cents or almost 3 percent at $ 3.17 on the New York Stock Exchange in late afternoon trading.


Dubai Aerospace signs $480 million loan deal

Updated 21 May 2018
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Dubai Aerospace signs $480 million loan deal

DUBAI: Dubai Aerospace Enterprise (DAE), one of the world’s largest aircraft lessors, said on Monday it had signed a four-year loan deal for $480 million.
DAE, a government-controlled company set up in 2006, has become one of the world’s largest aircraft lessors after acquiring Dublin-based AWAS last year.
The acquisition tripled the Dubai aircraft leasing and maintenance company’s portfolio to about 400 aircraft worth more than $14 billion.
The $480 million loan, which includes both conventional and Islamic finance tranches, has a so-called “accordion facility” allowing it to be increased to up to $800 million.
With the loan, the company’s unsecured revolving credit facilities increase to between $1.125 billion and $1.445 billion, depending on final size of the latest deal, Firoz Tararpore, DAE’s chief executive, said in a statement.
“On a pro forma basis as of December 2017, if this facility is fully drawn and if the proceeds are used to pay down secured indebtedness, DAE’s percentage of unsecured debt would increase from 26 percent to a range of 31-34 percent.”
Last year, the company issued $2.3 billion in senior bonds split across three tranches last year, partly to finance the AWAS acquisition.
Tarapore said in an interview last week that DAE was in talks to buy a near-record total of 400 jetliners from Airbus and Boeing in an order that could be worth more than $40 billion at list prices.
Al Ahli Bank of Kuwait coordinated the latest loan deal and was also the lead arranger and joint bookrunner together with First Abu Dhabi Bank, while Noor Bank joined the deal as lead arranger.