Pentagon chief arrives in Egypt on Mideast tour

Updated 25 April 2013
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Pentagon chief arrives in Egypt on Mideast tour

CAIRO: US Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel landed in Egypt yesterday as part of a Middle East tour designed to bolster America's alliances amid growing concern over the fallout from Syria's roiling civil war.
In his first trip to the Middle East as Pentagon chief, Hagel is promoting longstanding US military ties with traditional allies, including Saudi Arabia and Israel, as a way of countering Iran and deterring militants.
Hagel, who was in Riyadh on Tuesday evening to finalize a major arms sale to Saudi Arabia, traveled to Cairo to meet his counterpart, General Abdel Fattah Al-Sissi, and later hold discussions with President Muhammad Mursi.
For years Egypt was at the center of America's strategic influence in the region but since the 2011 ouster of President Hosni Mubarak, the United States has had to contend with new political realities and an independent-minded government in Cairo.
US officials, however, say security ties cultivated over decades between the two countries have survived the revolution and that America's military leaders still have a direct channel to Egypt's powerful top brass.
"We can pick up the phone, the secretary of defense, and have his counterpart who we can talk to at any time," a senior defense official told reporters last week before Hagel's trip. "Despite changes in the Egyptian military and political system, that's been constant."
In the post-Mubarak era, the United States still provides more than a billion dollars in annual military aid to Egypt. The huge funding package has always been seen as a way of ensuring Cairo abide by the 1979 peace accords with Israel.
Hagel and his counterparts are expected to discuss relations with Israel, deteriorating security in the Sinai Peninsula and Egypt's domestic politics, officials said.
Hagel's visit coincides with political crises and power struggles in Egypt, including a hemorrhaging economy and threats by the opposition to boycott parliamentary elections.
"He'll have an opportunity to talk directly with Egyptian officials about the difficult times they're in," said the defense official.
Hagel's trip will mark the first meeting between US and Egyptian defense chiefs since former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta paid a visit last August.
The new Pentagon chief, who took office two months ago, came to the Middle East touting an elaborate arms deal with Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Israel designed to bolster America's partners as a counterweight to Iran. But Syria's raging civil war has topped the agenda through much of Hagel's trip, amid renewed fears Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime has turned to deadly chemical weapons in its fight with rebel forces.
The United States has said any use or transfer of chemical weapons would cross a "red line" and possibly trigger military action.

But Hagel's spokesman said the US government was still not convinced chemical agents had been employed and that the claims were being reviewed.
Hagel began his tour with a three-day visit to Israel and he stopped in Jordan before flying to Riyadh on Tuesday.
After discussions in Egypt, Hagel will head to the United Arab Emirates, which has signed up to buy nearly $ 5 billion worth of American-made F-16 fighter jets as well as sophisticated missiles that can hit targets at a long-range.


Oman ‘still needs expats,’ ministry says

Updated 40 min 17 sec ago
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Oman ‘still needs expats,’ ministry says

  • The ministry said expat workers are needed because the country is working on “mega infrastructure projects”
  • Expats make up almost 90 percent of Oman’s private sector workforce, which the government has been trying to reduce

DUBAI: Driving down the number of expat workers in Oman’s private sector is “going to take a long time,” a senior official at the Ministry of Manpower said, highlighting infrastructure projects as areas where expat workers are needed.
Despite ongoing efforts to integrate more Omanis in the workforce, the ministry said the country still needs expat workers for “mega infrastructure projects.”
Expats make up almost 90 percent of Oman’s private sector workforce, which the government has been trying to reduce through its Omanization policies.
“Some professions in the private sector are Omanized and restricted to Omanis, such as administrative professions and some senior leadership positions, such as personnel managers and human resource managers. The Ministry of Manpower also issued a decision to ban the recruitment of a non-Omani labor force in some professions, as well introduced a hike in work permit fees for the expatriate labor force,” Salim bin Nasser Al Harami, Director General of Planning and Development at the Ministry of Manpower, told local daily Times of Oman.
The expatriate visa ban halted the hiring of expats to jobs across 87 sectors which include information systems, accounting and finance, sales and marketing, administration, human resources and insurance.
These efforts resulted in a two percent decline in October, which Al Hadrami said was a “a good and positive indicator.”
The National Center for Statistics & Information in Oman reported that of the 2,041,190 workers in the private sector, only 250,717 are Omanis, with the vast majority – 87.72 percent – being expatriates.
The Omanization drive aims to recruit more of local citizens in private companies — a similar push across the GCC where countries like Saudi Arabia and Kuwait who have also been trying to increase the number of nationals in private sector employment.