Justin Bieber rocks first of two concerts in Dubai

Updated 06 May 2013
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Justin Bieber rocks first of two concerts in Dubai

DUBAI: Fans flew from all over the Middle East, including Saudi Arabia, to watch teenage sensation Justin Bieber kick off the first of his two performances in Dubai on Saturday. The concert began to a chorus of boos from the 15,000 strong crowd as the singer arrived on stage two hours later than his scheduled start time of 8 p.m. Bieber arrived at the Sevens stadium in a Lamborghini at 9.30 p.m. and a ten minute countdown appeared on the screens. Dressed in an all-white ensemble, he looked very much like the pop sensation he is, as the excitement spread inside the 15,000-capacity venue.

“Dubai are you ready to have some fun tonight?” he asked as the screams got louder.
He started with his hit song “All Around the World” before launching into a medley of “One Time,” “Eenie Meenie” and “Somebody to Love.” Fans
“What’s up Dubai?” he managed after singing his second song, one of the few times he tried to connect with his adoring fans. “This is my first time in Dubai and I love you so much that I decided to add another day.”
“You guys don’t mind if I get a little comfortable?” he then asked, removing his jacket and revealing a white vest — cue more screams — before singing the mellow “Caching Feelings.” watched home videos of the star as a young kid playing the drums, as well as footage of him getting his famous haircut.
He waited until his encore to perform fan favorites, “Boyfriend” and “Baby,” to huge screams from the audience. And to many Beliebers, that made up for everything.


Ethiopia says British museum must permanently return its artifacts

Updated 24 April 2018
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Ethiopia says British museum must permanently return its artifacts

  • The artifacts were plundered by British troops from the fortress of Emperor Tewodros II 150 years ago
  • Among the items on display at the Victoria and Albert Museum are sacred manuscripts and gold 

ADDIS ABABA: Britain must permanently return all artifacts from Ethiopia held by the Victoria and Albert Museum and Addis Ababa will not accept them on loan, an Ethiopian government official said.
The call comes after the museum, one of London’s most popular tourist attractions, put Ethiopian treasures plundered by British forces on display.
“Well, it would be exciting if the items held at the V&A could be part of a long-term loan with a cultural institution in Ethiopia,” museum director Tristram Hunt said.
“These items have never been on a long-term loan in Ethiopia, but as we look to the future I think what we’re interested in are partnerships around conservation, interpretation, heritage management, and these need to be supported by government assistance so that institutions like the V&A can support sister institutions in Ethiopia.”
Among the items on display are sacred manuscripts and gold taken from the Battle of Maqdala 150 years ago, when British troops ransacked the fortress of Emperor Tewodros II.
The offer of a loan did not go far enough for Ethiopia.
“What we have asked (for) was the restitution of our heritage, our Maqdala heritage, looted from Maqdala 150 years ago. We presented our request in 2007 and we are waiting for it,” said government minister Hirut Woldemariam said.
Ephrem Amare, Ethiopian National Museum director, added: “It is clearly known where these treasures came from and whom they belong to. Our main demand has never been to borrow them. Ethiopia’s demand has always been the restoration of those illegally looted treasures. Not to borrow them.”
The V&A could not immediately be reached for further comment on Monday.
In launching the Maqdala 1868 exhibition of what Hunt called “stunning pieces with a complex history” this month, he said the display had been organized in consultation with the Ethiopian community in London.
“As custodians of these Ethiopian treasures, we have a responsibility to celebrate the beauty of their craftsmanship, shine a light on their cultural and religious significance and reflect on their living meaning, while being open about how they came to Britain,” he said in a blog on the museum website.