Company launches first ‘beardvertising’ network

Updated 27 May 2013
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Company launches first ‘beardvertising’ network

KENTUCKY: A company has launched the first ‘beardvertising’ network. The concept allows individuals with an “epic beard” to use it as advertising space for a charge, Metro reports. The Kentucky-based advertising agency Cornett-IMS is offering men “up to $ 5 per day” to wear the clip-on adverts.
Their website reads: “Do people stare at its awesomeness? Of course they do. “Do you wanna get paid for having an epic beard? Join the world’s first Beardvertising network. “It’s simple — turn your beard into a business. Hang a BeardBoard (Patent Pending) in your beard. Sit back and get paid up to $ 5 per day.” “I think it’s the next big thing,” company executive Whit Hiler told Business Insider.
“Everybody loves beards. We’re getting a ton of emails from guys with epic beards that want to host beardboards and we’re actually in talks with some brands that want to be Beardvertisers. “I think we’ll probably be seeing some ‘beardboards’ in the wild before too long.


#MeToo hits Pakistan as allegations mount against leading singer

Updated 21 April 2018
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#MeToo hits Pakistan as allegations mount against leading singer

  • Actress Meesha Shafi posted a lengthy message on Twitter, accusing singer Ali Zafar of physically harassing her on “more than one occasion”
  • “No woman goes public with allegations like this just for, fun," tweeted Pakistani novelist and columnist Bina Shah

ISLAMABAD: Pressure mounted Friday against Pakistani singer Ali Zafar after he was hit with a sexual harassment allegation by a leading actress in the first high profile “#metoo” accusation in the staunchly patriarchal country.
The allegations were trending across social media in Pakistan after popular actress Meesha Shafi posted a lengthy message on Twitter, accusing Zafar of physically harassing her on “more than one occasion.”
“This happened to me despite the fact I am an empowered, accomplished woman who is known for speaking her mind!” read the statement.
Zafar denied the accusations, threatening legal action against the actress.
“I intend to take this through the courts of law, and to address this professionally and seriously rather than to lodge any accusations here,” he wrote on Twitter.
Following the accusation, other high-profile voices were quick to lend their support.
“No woman goes public with allegations like this just for, fun. Obviously, you spend no time listening to women when they talk about how widespread harassment is in our society,” tweeted Pakistani novelist and columnist Bina Shah.
Zafar has dominated the music charts in Pakistan for nearly two decades and has also starred in a number of films including Bollywood satire “Tere bin Laden” which translates as “Your Bin Laden.”
The #MeToo and #Timesup campaigns have gone global since allegations of sexual misconduct by Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein were published last October, sparking an avalanche of accusations against other powerful men.
However, the movement has been slow to catch on in Pakistan, where women have fought for their rights for years in a patriarchal society where so-called “honor” killings and attacks on women remain commonplace.
In a report released earlier this week by watchdog Human Rights Commission Pakistan, the group said violence against women remained troubling, with 5,660 related crimes reported in the country’s four provinces in the first 10 months of 2017.
In August, firebrand opposition leader Imran Khan was also hit with allegations of sexual misconduct by a female lawmaker who accused the famed cricketer of sending obscene text messages and promoting a culture of sexism within his Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party.
He later denied the allegations.