Dozens of mummies found in pre-Inca royal tomb in Peru

Updated 02 July 2013
0

Dozens of mummies found in pre-Inca royal tomb in Peru

LIMA: Polish and Peruvian archaeologists have discovered a royal burial chamber with 60 mummies and some 1,200 gold, silver and ceramic objects from over 1,000 years ago in Peru.
The mummies — including three princesses — and other items date back to a pre-Inca culture called the Wari, who peaked between the seventh and 11th centuries, researchers said.
“This is a unique find,” said archaeologist Giersz Milosz of the University of Warsaw on Friday. “This is the first Peruvian discovery of a royal tomb from the Wari culture,” of which little is known.
The find, in an area known as El Castillo, about 300 kms north of Lima, follows two earlier finds by the Polish and Peruvian team in 2010.
The chamber was discovered two meters underground and covered with 33 tons of gravel. The tombs of the princesses — apparently wives of Wari chiefs — were at one end of the 17 square meter chamber.
Most of the mummies were women, buried in an upright position, a sign of rank, according to the researchers.
They were adorned in silver and gold jewelry, and buried with ceramic vessels and baskets filled with more jewelry.
Archaeologist also found pots, pitchers, carved stone objects, ceremonial knives and other objects in good condition and of great cultural value, said researcher Patrycja Przadka-Giersz, wife of Giersz.


Weinstein reaches deal to settle civil proceedings for $44 million: report

Updated 24 May 2019
0

Weinstein reaches deal to settle civil proceedings for $44 million: report

  • The deal, which has not yet been signed, aims to cover all civil proceedings filed against the fallen Hollywood mogul
  • The settlement does not exempt Weinstein from the criminal proceedings brought against him for sexual assault

NEW YORK: Disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein has reached a provisional $44 million settlement with alleged victims and creditors, the Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday.
The deal, which has not yet been signed, aims to cover all civil proceedings filed against the fallen Hollywood mogul, including those in Canada and the United Kingdom.
Weinstein’s spokesperson denied to comment.
The settlement does not exempt Weinstein from the criminal proceedings brought against him for sexual assault, for which he will go on trial in September.
Weinstein — a catalyst for the #MeToo anti-harassment movement — has been charged over the alleged assaults of two women and faces life in prison if he is convicted at the trial, which could last five weeks.
In addition to the alleged victims and creditors, the settlement covers the proceedings started by former New York state attorney general Eric Schneiderman, who has been succeeded by Letitia James.
The proceedings aim specifically to guarantee the alleged victims will be compensated.
James’s spokesperson also declined to comment.
The settlement amount will be paid out by insurance agencies, the Journal reported, several of which count The Weinstein Company, the production company Weinstein co-founded, among their clients.
Since October 2017, Weinstein — one of the most powerful men in Hollywood before a cascade of sexual misconduct allegations precipitated his downfall — has been accused of sexual harassment and assault by more than 80 women.
Among his accusers are prominent actresses such as Ashley Judd, Angelina Jolie and Salma Hayek.