Bolivia files UN complaint after president’s jet diverted

Updated 04 July 2013
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Bolivia files UN complaint after president’s jet diverted

LA PAZ: Bolivia lodged a complaint yesterday with the United Nations and planned another to the UN Human Rights Commission against several European countries that closed their airspace to the plane carrying President Evo Morales.
“As a government, we are filing complaints worldwide,” said Vice President and acting head of state Alvaro Garcia.
“We have already made the complaint to the United Nations and in the next few hours, we are making a complaint to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights,” Garcia said, over what he called an international rights violation that put the president’s life at risk.
Bolivia said Morales was flying from Moscow back to Bolivia when his plane was forced to land in Vienna on suspicion fugitive US leaker Edward Snowden may be on board.
The flight had originally taken off late Tuesday from Moscow, where 30-year-old Snowden has been holed up for days, just hours after Morales said his country would consider giving him political asylum.
While in flight, Bolivia said the pilot learned Portugal refused to allow the plane to land for refueling, and then France, Italy and Spain banned the plane from entering its airspace.
On the ground in Vienna, police searched the plane and found no sign of the US fugitive, and the European countries reauthorized the use of their airspace.
The diversion has sparked outrage from other Latin American leaders, with Argentine President Cristina Kirchner calling the incident “very humiliating.” In a series of tweets on her official account, the president said, “they are definitely all crazy. The head of state and his plane have total immunity.”
Kirchner said she had spoken to Uruguayan President Jose Mujica, who was equally outraged.
And Organization of American States chief Jose Miguel Insulza demanded an explanation about the incident, which he said endangered the president’s life.
“Nothing justifies such a disrespectful act toward a country’s highest authority.”


Afghans vote in crucial parliamentary elections, amid attacks, major irregularities reported

Updated 20 October 2018
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Afghans vote in crucial parliamentary elections, amid attacks, major irregularities reported

  • Scores of people, including 10 candidates, have died in a series of attacks by Taliban and Daesh in recent months
  • Initial results of the vote will be released in three weeks’ time

KABUL: Afghans cast their vote on Saturday for a new parliament despite numerous attacks in several parts of the country, including Kabul, and amid reports of widespread irregularities.
Initial results of the vote, delayed by more than three years because of a power struggle in the government, will be released in three weeks’ time.
Final results will be published after two months.
The ballot is regarded as crucial for the stability of Afghanistan, wracked by more than four decades of war, foreign interventions and tribal rift.
The latest poll is the third for choosing a legislative body since the ouster of the Taliban in late 2001 in a US-led invasion.
Many candidates are young and educated men and women who want to replace current MPs at the house, regarded as one dominated by corrupt elements and factional members as Taliban and Daesh spread their attacks in the country.
The Taliban guerrillas had threatened to disrupt the process, conducted various attacks, including firing mortars, suicide raids and bomb blasts near some polling stations, including in at least five areas of Kabul.
There were reports of some casualties among voters and security forces.
“Today, we proved together that we uphold democracy with casting out ballots without fear, we honor the sacrifices of the fallen,” President Ashraf Ghani told reporters after casting his vote in a highly protected school near the presidential palace in Kabul.
Cases of widespread irregularities across the country were reported by journalists, locals and even government officials.
They include late opening of sites, lack of knowledge of some election works in recording votes and use of biometric devices, aimed at reducing fraud, which is another major concern apart from security threats.
Observers and media were barred from visiting some sites. Some stations did not open at all. The country’s second Chief Executive, Mohammad Mohaqiq, openly said that at least 22 stations did not open at all in only two areas in Kabul city itself.
Simar Soresh, a spokesman for the election commission, confirmed that some sites remained closed owing to “technical challenges,” vowing to prolong voting hours when they open.
Many blamed the government appointed elections body for the shortcomings. The body has faced organizational problems and a rift owing to a power struggle among government leaders.
Some frustrated voters even went back home after waiting for hours for the opening of polling stations in Kabul.
In one such station, a policeman asked voters if they knew the voting process so he could let the station open. In northern Maimana, people complained that there were no biometric devices in place.
In others, voters said they could not find their names on the books where they had registered months before during the registration process. It would take at least five minutes for a voter to cast a vote.
One journalist covering the event closely described the situation as “Mismanagement and chaos across the country.”
“This is just a joke, I am leaving. I came to vote despite the Taliban warning, but you see the mess and confusion and heard the blasts. It is not worth dying for this because the process is not handled properly,” Zaman Khan, a bewildered voter in a central area of Kabul, told Arab News.
The irregularities that led to closure and caused slow voting process are seen as a further blow to the voting, which is funded by donors’ money.
The government already had said it could not open some 2,000 sites because of security threats.
Scores of people, including 10 candidates, have died in a series of attacks by Taliban and Daesh in recent months.
The government delayed the holding of the polls in the historically important southern Kandahar for a week after an attack that killed its powerful police chief and intelligence head.
Bilal Sarwary, a candidate from eastern Kunar, said like some other parts of the country, there were “high irregularities” during the voting there.
“Some sites opened very late. The biometric system did not work in some sites and in others they were slow or election workers did not know how to use them,” he told Arab News by phone.
“Some state officials interfered in some sites; there were no voting papers in some areas. Overall there were irregularities and confusion. It is a pity that with the sacrifice and so much money, irregularities marred the process.”