‘South Sudan failing after two years of freedom’

Updated 10 July 2013
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‘South Sudan failing after two years of freedom’

JUBA: South Sudan is guilty of widespread human rights abuses and awash with corruption, campaigners warned on the second anniversary of the country’s independence yesterday.
US activists who backed the split from Sudan claimed in a letter that the fledgling country faces “an increasingly perilous state.”
Signatories of the letter, which accuses the new country of failing its own people and repeating the mistakes of previous rulers before independence, include John Prendergast, a former director for African affairs at the White House’s National Security Council.
“Many people in South Sudan are suffering, yet government officials seem to care only about themselves,” reads the letter, also signed by former US State Department officials including Ted Dagne, a former adviser to the government.
“We joined you in your fight against these very abuses by the Khartoum regime for many years,” they wrote in the letter, which is addressed to South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir.
“We cannot turn a blind eye when yesterday’s victims become today’s perpetrators,” they said.
 


Tunisia reopens consulate in Libyan capital Tripoli

Updated 21 min 22 sec ago
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Tunisia reopens consulate in Libyan capital Tripoli

  • Most embassies left Tripoli in 2014 when heavy fighting broke out between rival factions.
  • Only a few embassies came back when a UN-backed administration took office in 2016.

Tripoli: Tunisia has reopened its consulate in the Libyan capital, the Libya foreign ministry said on Saturday, the latest mission to return to Tripoli.
Most embassies left Tripoli in 2014 when heavy fighting broke out between rival factions and few came back when a UN-backed administration took office in 2016.
The Tunisian consulate resumed work after talks between the two countries, the Libyan foreign ministry said. The Tunisian foreign ministry declined to comment, but a diplomatic source confirmed the move.
Tunisian had closed its mission 2015 after ten staff were kidnapped.
In recent weeks some Western embassies have sent diplomats for longer stays to Tripoli as security has improved, although few stay full time on the ground.
The Italian and Turkish embassies as well as the UN mission are among the few open.
Tripoli is formally run by a Government of National Accord backed by the UN but in reality controlled by a patchwork of armed groups.
Big street clashes between rival groups have ended, but several rockets which hit Tripoli airport this week were a reminder that security remains shaky.
The UN has been trying to meditate to produce a national government and end the rift between the administration in Tripoli and a rival one in the east, part of a conflict gripping the oil producer since the toppling of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011.