13 shops closed for not hiring women

Updated 17 July 2013
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13 shops closed for not hiring women

The Ministry of Labor has closed 13 shops in a Riyadh mall for failing to hire Saudi women.
The closure is part of the ministry's campaign that started on Monday, to enforce the feminization of all clothing stores for women in the country. This includes abaya and lingerie stores.
The ministry's field inspectors issued warnings to other shop owners and gave them time to hire women before the next inspections.
Saud Al-Sinitan, field inspection supervisor at the ministry, said that the ministry has a penalty system that includes closing a violating shop's account with the ministry, providing a grace period to rectify its situation, and finally complete closure if the shop fails to comply.
“We have fulltime field inspectors across the Kingdom to enforce the ministry's regulations,” he said.
“We are going to visit every single woman clothing and abaya shops in all malls to make sure they only hire women,” he said.
He said the ministry works with the municipality and the passport department to enforce labor laws. Closed shops would only reopen once Saudi women are hired, he said.
Al-Sinitan said there are women inspectors in the field to report on shops trying to circumvent the regulations.
He said the ministry does not “name and shame” but are determined to ensure this part of the country's Saudization program is enforced.


Green light for crown prince-led Saudi privatization program

Updated 25 April 2018
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Green light for crown prince-led Saudi privatization program

  • The Privatization Program is one of 12 key elements of the Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030
  • The program is aimed at increasing job opportunities for Saudi nationals

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s Council of Economic and Development Affairs on Tuesday approved the Privatization Program that is one of 12 key elements of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030. 

The program is aimed at increasing job opportunities for Saudi nationals, attracting the latest technologies and innovations, and supporting economic development.

It encourages both local and foreign investment in order to enhance the role of the private sector, with government entities adopting a regulatory and supervisory role. The aim is to increase the private sector’s contribution to GDP from 40 percent to 65 percent by 2030. 

The program will aim to reach its objectives through encouraging the private sector to invest in establishing new schools, universities and health centers, while the government pursues its organizational and supervisory role in health and education.

The privatization program aims to benefit from previous success stories, with the private sector’s collaboration in the development of infrastructure, and its involvement on a large scale in sectors such as energy, water, transport, telecommunications, petrochemicals and finance.

The program sets out a series of objectives in three areas: Developing a general legal framework for policies related to privatization; establishing organizational foundations and dedicated institutions to execute the policies; and setting a timescale for their delivery. 

The Council of Economic and Development Affairs is headed by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.