Saudia privatization in final stages

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Updated 12 August 2013
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Saudia privatization in final stages

The privatization of Saudi Arabian Airlines is in the final stages, said Prince Fahd bin Abdullah, president of the General Authority of Civil Aviation, and chairman of the airline’s board of directors.
“We hope Saudia’s privatization process would be completed shortly,” the prince told reporters after witnessing the signing of an agreement for the privatization of the Saudi Aerospace Engineering Industries (SAEI).
He said Qatar Airways and Gulf Air, which are licensed to operate domestic flights in the Kingdom, are scheduled to start their operations within the next three months after completing some establishment procedures and opening their offices in the Kingdom.
Saudia has sold 30 percent of its stake in SAEI to Tarabut Aircraft Maintenance Company, an affiliate of Integrated Transport Company (ITC). The agreement between the two organizations was signed by Prince Sultan bin Muhammad bin Saud Al-Kabir, chairman of ITC, and Khaled Al-Molhem, director general of Saudia.
Prince Fahd emphasized the important role of SAEI, which provides aircraft maintenance services not only for Saudia but also for foreign airlines. “We hope it would become a major aircraft maintenance center in the Middle East,” the chairman said.
Al-Molhem said: “This is another important step toward privatization of the airline’s strategic units and it was decided after conducting adequate studies with the support of international consulting firms.”
The Saudia chief underscored the desire of investors to participate in Saudia’s privatization process. “This strategic partnership will have great benefits for the Kingdom as well as investors. This is a model of successful partnership between the public and private sectors,” he added.
Prince Fahd chaired a meeting of Saudia’s board to discuss the financial reports and operational performance during the first half of 2013, its Haj and Umrah plan for this year and the airline’s efforts to modernize its fleet, develop its IT infrastructure and improve services to passengers.
“We have to achieve higher operational rates to compete with other airlines at regional and international levels,” the chairman said.


Apple China says it will push software update in bid to resolve Qualcomm case

Updated 14 December 2018
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Apple China says it will push software update in bid to resolve Qualcomm case

  • Apple will carry out the software updates at the start of next week to address the concern
  • A court found Apple infringed two patents held by the chipmaker and banned sales of older iPhone models

SHANGHAI/SAN FRANCISCO: Apple Inc. , facing a court ban in China on some of its iPhone models over alleged infringement of Qualcomm Inc. patents, said on Friday it will push software updates to users in a bid to resolve potential issues.
Apple will carry out the software updates at the start of next week “to address any possible concern about our compliance with the order,” the firm said in a statement sent to Reuters.
Earlier this week, Qualcomm said a Chinese court had ordered a ban on sales of some older Apple iPhone models for violating two of its patents, though intellectual property lawyers said the ban would still likely take time to enforce.
“Based on the iPhone models we offer today in China, we believe we are in compliance,” Apple said.
“Early next week we will deliver a software update for iPhone users in China addressing the minor functionality of the two patents at issue in the case.”
The case, brought by Qualcomm, is part of a global patent dispute between the two US companies that includes dozens of lawsuits. It creates uncertainty over Apple’s business in one of its biggest markets at a time when concerns over waning demand for new iPhones are battering its shares.
Qualcomm has said that the Fuzhou Intermediate People’s Court in China found Apple infringed two patents held by the chipmaker and ordered an immediate ban on sales of older iPhone models, from the 6S through the X.
Apple has said that all of its phone models remained on sale in mainland China and that it had filed a request for reconsideration with the court. All the models appeared to be available to buy on Apple’s China website on Friday.
Qualcomm, the biggest supplier of chips for mobile phones, filed its case in China in late 2017, arguing that Apple infringed patents on features related to resizing photographs and managing apps on a touch screen.