Jennifer Garner, Halle Berry push anti-paparazzi bill

Updated 18 August 2013
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Jennifer Garner, Halle Berry push anti-paparazzi bill

LOS ANGELES, California: Hollywood stars Halle Berry and Jennifer Garner urged California lawmakers Tuesday to back a bill aimed at limiting the ability of paparazzi to photograph children of celebrities, local media reported.
The legislation, which specifically targets paparazzi and was introduced by a Democratic senator, would widen the legal definition of harassment to include taking pictures of or recording a child without the permission of a legal guardian.
“We’re not just whiny celebrities... We are moms here trying to protect our children,” Berry, 47, testified according to television station KTLA.
“I am asking you as a parent to pay attention,” echoed Garner, 41, who has three children with actor Ben Affleck. “Would you do anything differently for your child?“
US media and paparazzi say the legislation limits their right to information. Berry, who is pregnant with her second child, already testified in favor of the bill in June. At the time, she said her daughter was scared to go to school because of the paparazzi.
“Here come these men with cameras, besieging the school and these little children, all to get a photograph,” she told lawmakers in Sacramento, the Californian capital.
“They cause chaos, they cause fear, the children and their parents are horrified, we start arguing, everybody’s fighting and the men seem to don’t care at all.”
The bill still has a ways to go before becoming law. If it makes it through the California legislature, it would head to the desk of Governor Jerry Brown who has the right to veto it.
Berry married French actor Olivier Martinez last month and the two are expecting their first child. Berry is also the mother of a five-year-old girl whose father is model Gabriel Aubry.
Garner and Affleck’s children are aged 7, 4 and 1.


Chip Wickham ushers in winds of change on the jazz scene

Updated 22 May 2018
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Chip Wickham ushers in winds of change on the jazz scene

PARIS: The hotly hyped “British jazz invasion” has been the toast of international scenesters for some months now, with breathy adjective-heavy sprawls penned on both sides of the Atlantic paying tribute to a fresh generation of musos who grew up not in the conservatoires but the clubs, channelling the grit and groove of grime into a distinctly hip, 21st century strain of freewheeling, DIY improvised music.

Now the Arab world has its own outpost in the form of Chip Wickham, a UK-born flautist, saxophonist and producer whose second album grew out of extended stints teaching in the GCC. “Shamal Wind” takes its name from the Gulf’s primal weather patterns, and there’s a distinctly meditative, Middle Eastern vibe to the title track, a slow-burning, moody vamp, peppered with percussive trills, with hints of Yusef Lateef to be found in Wickham’s wandering woodwind musings.

There’s rather less goatee-stroking to be found across the four further up-tempo cuts, which swap soul-searching for soul-jazz, soaked in the breezy bop of a vintage Blue Note release. Recorded over a hot summer in Madrid, a heady Latin pulse drives first single, “Barrio 71” — championed by the likes of Craig Charles — with Spanish multi-percussionist David el Indio steaming up a block party beat framing Wickham’s gutsy workout on baritone sax.

Having previously worked with electronic acts, including Nightmares on Wax and Jimpster, one imagines the dancefloor was a key stimulus behind Wickham’s rhythmically dense, but harmonically spare compositional approach. Phil Wilkinson’s sheer, thumped piano chords drive the relentless nod of second single “Snake Eyes,” Wickham’s raspy flute floating somewhere overhead, readymade to be skimmed off for the anticipated remix market.

In truth, Manchester-raised Wickham is both too thoughtful, and too thoughtless, to truly belong to the London-brewed jazz invasion — Shamal Wind yo-yos between meditative meandering and soulful strutting with a wilful disrespect for trend.