Health Ministry moves to stop doctors’ malpractices

Updated 18 August 2013
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Health Ministry moves to stop doctors’ malpractices

The Ministry of Health has submitted a proposal to amend article 7 of the Private Health Facilities System so it can approve charges of medical services.
The move aims to curb some doctors’ malpractices that exploit patients financially, including prescribing unnecessary tests and X-rays.
Authorities are currently studying the proposal, said Ali Al-Zawawi, the ministry’s undersecretary for private health care sector affairs.
The ministry has carried out a number of inspections of private health care facilities to make sure they are working in compliance with rules and regulations. The inspection committees from regional health affairs departments made unannounced visits and followed up on citizens’ complaints they received via the ministry’s online portal.
The ministry’s statistics for 2012 showed its efforts in detecting and tackling any shortcomings in the health services. The number of closures for private health facilities and pharmacological services reached 136. The number of private facilities’ violations that were followed by decisions reached 1,625. Actions taken against medical and technical staff numbered 1,030, while the Shariah Health Commission (the authority that issues verdicts in disputes between facilities and patients) issued 485 verdicts against medical and technical staff.
Al-Zawawi said the ministry took a strong step forward when it forced government and private health care establishments to have a certificate showing they are abiding by quality specifications stated by the ministry.
These specifications will be one of the requirements for renewing and issuing new licenses. This will raise the quality level of medical services.


Saudi ‘Cultural Days’ attracts crowds in Turkmenistan

Updated 4 min 7 sec ago
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Saudi ‘Cultural Days’ attracts crowds in Turkmenistan

  • Lecture highlights historical relations between Turkmenistan, Arabian Peninsula

ASHGABAT, Turkmenistan: This weekend saw a three-day celebration of Saudi Arabian culture take place in Turkmenistan.
Saudi “Cultural Days” opened to visitors on Friday and concluded Sunday. On Thursday night, an official opening ceremony took place at Al-Maqam Palace.
The event included a number of exhibitions, displayed at the Museum of Fine Arts in the Turkmen capital, Ashgabat.
The pavilion of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques Institute for Hajj and Umrah Research took visitors on a virtual-reality journey through the Two Holy Mosques of Makkah and Madinah and the holy sites, highlighting their expansion and development. It also featured photos and models of projects dating back to the founding of Saudi Arabia, in addition to a number of research papers produced by the institute.
Elsewhere, a pavilion of traditional Saudi costumes displayed dresses from several regions of the Kingdome, which visitors could try on for themselves, and the Darah Foundation provided a history of Saudi-Turkmen relations, with a particular focus on cultural ties, and exhibited artworks that reflected society and the environment in the Kingdom.
A pavilion dedicated to the Zamzam Project explained the evolution of the methods of extracting water from the historic well and distributing it to the Two Holy Mosques.
The College of Agriculture at Qassim University hosted a palm and date exhibition at its pavilion, and there were also pavilions dedicated to Arabic calligraphy; hospitality; the art of henna; and traditional folk dances and music.
On Saturday, the Saudi delegation for “Cultural Days” — which included Saudi Ambassador to Turkmenistan Khalid bin Faisal Al-Sahli, and the Ministry of Media’s general supervisor for international cultural relations, Omar bin Mohammed Al-Aqeel — visited Magtymguly State University in Ashgabat.
During the visit, Dr. Ibrahim bin Mohammed Al-Muzaini and Dr. Hamoud bin Mohammed Al-Najidi of the Imam Muhammad ibn Saud Islamic University delivered a lecture titled “The importance of the Silk Road, and historical and cultural relations between Turkmenistan and the Arabian Peninsula.”
Al-Muzaini described Turkmenistan as “the jewel of Asia Minor and the essence of history and civilization,” noting that the country is home to historical and archaeological sites dating back to the early Islamic era.
He explained that trading routes traditionally passed through Turkmenistan on their way to the Arabian Peninsula and other parts of the Islamic world.
Al-Muzaini proposed establishing a center to document relations between Saudi Arabia and Turkmenistan.
Al-Najidi highlighted the cultural ties between the two countries, focusing on the Arab presence in Turkmenistan as well as scientific, economic, and trade ties between the Kingdom and Turkmenistan, in addition to Hajj routes between the two countries.
He also discussed the Turkmen presence in Saudi Arabia through the Khurasan Road, emphasizing the developments and changes the road has gone through.
Ambassador Al-Sahli said in a press statement: “We aspire to assist those who promote and support Arabic language departments in Turkmen universities, and I look forward to agreements that support teaching Arabic in Turkmen universities through the employment of Saudi specialists.”
The dean of the College of Foreign Languages at the university, Dr. Awraz Qaldi Awad Saad, emphasized his country’s desire to include Arabic in its educational curricula, and to teach Turkmen heritage in foreign languages, including Arabic.