Anticipating raids, expat teachers are no-shows

Updated 03 September 2013
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Anticipating raids, expat teachers are no-shows

Many schools faced the problem of teacher absenteeism upon reopening in response to the Labor Ministry’s recent statement prohibiting daughters of expats from working.
Zuha Younes, a teacher at an international school, said: “There are many reasons that account for staff quitting their jobs, among which are low salaries and the fact that they have to pay half of the Iqama renewal fees. To top this off, there are new restrictions for expats to work.”
She added: “These are very difficult times for schools and teachers. The Ministry of Education needs to step in and help resolve the problem.”
Fiza Nafees, another teacher, said that almost 40 percent of teachers in her school had left because they were having trouble transferring their sponsorships.
Padma Hariharan, director and head of the Novel International Group of Institutes, said many teachers failed to show up because they don't want to transfer their sponsorships, while others had left fearing consequences.
“Though more than 80 percent of our staff turned up on the first day, this first week will be difficult. You can’t run a school properly when such matters are pending. Many teachers are not sure of what to do, as they are unable to work on a temporary basis. We hope that a clear decision will be taken by the ministry,” she said.
She said the ministry should take into consideration feedback from schools when implementing decisions.
Tanver, a principal at an international school, said: “All our teachers for higher grades were present on the first day of school. It is only at the lower school that many teachers have not reported for work,” she said.


Human Rights Watch declares Houthi Abha airport attack a 'war crime’ as another missile targets city

Updated 4 min 46 sec ago
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Human Rights Watch declares Houthi Abha airport attack a 'war crime’ as another missile targets city

  • Human Rights Watch urged the Houthis to stop attacks on civilian infrastructure in Saudi Arabia
  • The Houthi attack on the southwestern Saudi town of Abha's regional airport wounded 26 people Wednesday

CAIRO: A leading rights group has called an attack by the Iranian-backed Houthis on Abha airport in Saudi Arabia an "apparent war crime" as the city was targeted again Saturday by the militia's missiles.

An Al Arabiya reported said Saudi forces intercepted a ballistic missile above the southwestern Saudi city. On Friday, Saudi forces intercepted five drones from Yemen, the Arab military coalition fighting to support the government said.

The drones targeted Abha airport, where a Houthi missile on Wednesday injured 26 civilians, and the nearby city of Khamis Mushait.

Human Rights Watch on Saturday urged the Houthis to stop attacks on civilian infrastructure in Saudi Arabia. "Commanders who order deliberate or indiscriminate attacks on civilian objects are responsible for war crimes," the group said.

The coalition targeted Houthi military sites in Sanaa on Saturday, including the militia’s air defense systems, Al Arabiya reported.

The spokesperson of the coalition, Col. Turki Al-Maliki said the operation aimed to destroy the Houthi militia’s threat to regional and international security.

*With AP