Cost of sacrificial sheep rises to SR490

Updated 13 September 2013
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Cost of sacrificial sheep rises to SR490

The cost of a sheep for sacrifice during Haj has risen by SR40 to SR490.
The Islamic Development Bank (IDB) is the only institution authorized to run the Adahi program overseeing animal sacrifice during Haj. A number of countries buy Adahi coupons from the IDB during Haj.
Apart from importing sheep and other livestock from traditional sources such as Sudan, Somalia, Djibouti and Eritrea, the Kingdom has started buying from Uruguay and Pakistan. It has also restored imports from Turkey and Australia.
According to sources, the IDB procures livestock from local traders who import from abroad. They say the prices are fair considering that sheep from Sudan and Somalia costs SR1,000 and SR600 respectively during the Haj season.
Due to rampant incidents of cheating and fraud many are opting for the IDB's program.
The slaughtered sheep meat is distributed in Saudi Arabia through 270 charity societies and 24 countries in Asia and Africa.
Veterinarians check the livestock thoroughly to ensure compliance with health regulations and Islamic law.
Coupons can be purchased online at www.adahi.org, or at Saudi Post offices, branches of Al-Rajhi Bank and other locations.
Last year, criminals from India created a fake website that claimed to be associated with the IDB and tried to collect money online. The fraud was uncovered and customers were warned by Indian officials.


KSA setting up commission to help disabled people integrate with mainstream society

Prince Sultan bin Salman, chairman of the Riyadh-based King Salman Center for Disability Research (KSCDR), speaks in Riyadh on May 25, 2018
Updated 34 sec ago
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KSA setting up commission to help disabled people integrate with mainstream society

  • Prince Sultan bin Salman says the King Salman Center for Disability Research, which he chairs, will act as the commission's scientific arm…
  • Saudi people are aware of the challenges that people with special needs and their families face, and appreciate the positive contributions they make to society, says Prince Sultan.

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia will set up a high-powered national commission to help disabled people in the Kingdom integrate with mainstream society.

“The creation of this new commission is an important step, a historic move,” said Prince Sultan bin Salman, chairman of the Riyadh-based King Salman Center for Disability Research (KSCDR), on Friday.

Prince Sultan, who is also chairman of the Riyadh-based Disabled Children Association (DCA) and president and chairman of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), said that “the creation of the national commission by King Salman is a very important decision.”

“The commission is now under establishment. I am working closely with the Ministry of Labor on this,” he said.

“We are waiting for the announcement of the chief executive officer of the new commission.” The government will announce the commission’s board members shortly, he said.

Prince Sultan said: “The KSCDR will be working with the commission as the latter’s scientific arm… we will complement each other.”

Prince Sultan said the recent International Conference for Disability and Rehabilitation in Riyadh was “probably the biggest forum ever held in Saudi Arabia in terms of focusing on issues faced by people suffering from mental and physical disabilities.” 

More than 5,000 participants from around the world attended the conference in April.

Saudi people are aware of the challenges that people with special needs and their families face, and appreciate the positive contributions they make to society, Prince Sultan said.