Alfaisal University researchers bag US nanotech patent

Updated 18 March 2014
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Alfaisal University researchers bag US nanotech patent

A team of researchers from Alfaisal University here has received their first US patent for an innovative nanotechnology material.
The patent was granted on Oct. 14 to the three inventors Edreese Alsharaeh, Mohammad A. AlDosari and Ali Othman.
“We are immensely proud of Edreese not only for his research achievements, which includes a patent, but also for his dedication to his students as shown by his high student evaluations, and his selflessness in the area of service to Alfaisal,” said Nouredine Zettile, acting dean of the College of Science and General Studies at Alfaisal University.
He said Edreese has helped to “build a strong research-oriented institution as envisaged by the King Faisal Foundation.” Alfaisal University is one of the first private non-profit, research and teaching universities in the Kingdom, he said.
The patent is entitled “Composition and method of making nanocomposite containing graphene sheets.” The nanocomposite can be used for medical devices such as bone cement, dentures, paper, paint and the automotive industry. A novel microwave irradiation was used to obtain the sheets.
“The patent was granted less than six months after filing due in part to its novelty." He said AlDosari was from King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). "Alfaisal University has close collaborative research ties with KACST,” he said.


Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

Updated 17 April 2018
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Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

  • Previous research has shown a new blood test has potential to detect eight different kinds of tumors before they spread
  • The research starts in April and will run until September

TOKYO: A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.
Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.
It will now begin testing the method using some 250 urine samples, to see if samples at room temperature are suitable for analysis, Hitachi spokesman Chiharu Odaira told AFP.
“If this method is put to practical use, it will be a lot easier for people to get a cancer test, as there will be no need to go to a medical organization for a blood test,” he said.
It is also intended to be used to detect paediatric cancers.
“That will be especially beneficial in testing for small children” who are often afraid of needles, added Odaira.
Research published earlier this year demonstrated that a new blood test has shown promise toward detecting eight different kinds of tumors before they spread elsewhere in the body.
Usual diagnostic methods for breast cancer consist of a mammogram followed by a biopsy if a risk is detected.
For colon cancer, screening is generally conducted via a stool test and a colonoscopy for patients at high risk.
The Hitachi technology centers around detecting waste materials inside urine samples that act as a “biomarker” — a naturally occurring substance by which a particular disease can be identified, the company said in a statement.
The procedure aims to improve the early detection of cancer, saving lives and reducing the medical and social cost to the country, Odaira explained.
The experiment will start this month until through September in cooperation with Nagoya University in central Japan.
“We aim to put the technology in use in the 2020s, although this depends on various things such as getting approval from the authorities,” Odaira said.