Alfaisal University researchers bag US nanotech patent

Updated 18 March 2014
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Alfaisal University researchers bag US nanotech patent

A team of researchers from Alfaisal University here has received their first US patent for an innovative nanotechnology material.
The patent was granted on Oct. 14 to the three inventors Edreese Alsharaeh, Mohammad A. AlDosari and Ali Othman.
“We are immensely proud of Edreese not only for his research achievements, which includes a patent, but also for his dedication to his students as shown by his high student evaluations, and his selflessness in the area of service to Alfaisal,” said Nouredine Zettile, acting dean of the College of Science and General Studies at Alfaisal University.
He said Edreese has helped to “build a strong research-oriented institution as envisaged by the King Faisal Foundation.” Alfaisal University is one of the first private non-profit, research and teaching universities in the Kingdom, he said.
The patent is entitled “Composition and method of making nanocomposite containing graphene sheets.” The nanocomposite can be used for medical devices such as bone cement, dentures, paper, paint and the automotive industry. A novel microwave irradiation was used to obtain the sheets.
“The patent was granted less than six months after filing due in part to its novelty." He said AlDosari was from King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). "Alfaisal University has close collaborative research ties with KACST,” he said.


Australian teen sparks FBI action after hacking Apple -media

The Apple logo is seen on a computer screen in an illustration photo taken in Bordeaux, France, February 1, 2017. (REUTERS)
Updated 17 August 2018
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Australian teen sparks FBI action after hacking Apple -media

  • The report said the boy had boasted about his activities on the mobile messaging service WhatsApp
  • An Apple representative in Australia was not immediately available for comment

SYDNEY: An Australian teenager has pleaded guilty to hacking into the main computer network of technology giant Apple Inc, downloading big internal files and accessing customer accounts, because he was a fan of the company, local media reported.
The boy, 16, from Melbourne city, broke into the United States company’s mainframe from his suburban home many times over a year, The Age newspaper reported, citing statements by the teenager’s lawyer in court.
The teen downloaded 90 gigabytes of secure files and accessed customer accounts without exposing his identity. When Apple became aware of the intrusion it contacted the US Federal Bureau of Investigation, which referred the matter to the Australian Federal Police (AFP), the newspaper said, quoting statements made in court.
The AFP declined a Reuters request for comment on the grounds that the matter was before the court.
An Apple representative in Australia was not immediately available for comment.
The report said that an AFP raid on the boy’s family home produced two laptops, a mobile phone and a hard drive which matched the intrusion reported by Apple. The sensitive documents were saved in a folder called “hacky hack hack,” the report added.
The report said the boy had boasted about his activities on the mobile messaging service WhatsApp.
The boy’s name could not be made public because he was a juvenile offender.
The report said the boy would be sentenced next month.