Why Muhammad was a true Prophet

Updated 17 January 2014
0

Why Muhammad was a true Prophet

While discussing the prophethood of Muhammad Mustafa (peace be upon him), we need to go into the backdrop in which the Qur’an was revealed.
Sixth century Arabia was steeped in darkness, as the modern science then was unknown to mankind. The traces of knowledge that were still there were in the shape of Torah, the Psalms of David, and the Bible. The original versions of these Books were lost, and the Jewish and Christian scholars would write them on their own. The books were nothing but scattered pieces of historical events of few prophets (peace be upon them all) carrying no chain of evidence in their narrations.
The Babylon, Egyptian and the Greek cultures were buried. Traces of fine arts speaking of the cultures like those of Egyptian pyramids were available. Ruins could be seen of the Roman culture.
After Islam’s advent, the Muslim scholars revived the philosophy of Plato, Aristotle and Socrates, many of which were proved wrong by science. In short, nothing was known of them before Islam.
Man did not know, 1400 years ago, the matter and its elements; they never had any telescope to see the stars; and thus wrongfully fancied that stars ruled the destinies of the people. They thought earth was a plain surface; it never occurred to them that it was round. Few worshipped the sun and called it sun god. They thought that it rises, it sets and emits heat, it runs right east to west and to them only a god could emit heat and make such a long run. They were not aware of the effects of the winds nor did they know the layers of the atmosphere. Arabian Peninsula in particular had no record of any knowledge then.
In such a background, Allah Almighty sent Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him). He was unlettered. The angel Gabriel (peace be upon him) gave him with first revelation: “He has taught man that which he knew not.” (Qur’an, 96:5)
Glory be to God, He taught mankind through his Prophet. He revealed many facts in His Book, the Qur’an, which could be unveiled only after modern scientific development i.e. almost 1,000 or more after the revelation of the Qur’an proving it undoubtedly to be a Book of God.
Qur’an is the book, which brought humanity from pre-scientific age to the age of rationalism. It invited mankind to observe and contemplate the phenomena of nature, including life and death, the creation of the heavens and the earth, the alteration of the day and night, sailing of the ships, the rains which, is sent down from the sky and in the animal life, the changing of the winds, the trailing of the clouds between the sky and the earth. All this phenomena of nature contains the signs of God to believe in his Divine Omnipotence.
The very first line that the Prophet received, “Read in the name of thy Lord, Who created man from something that clings.” (96:1-4) invited our attention to the Lord, the Creator and to His creation. There are other verses too, which explain the processing of the embryo I quote here few of them: “Verily We created man from a drop of mingled liquids to test him, So We make him hearing and knowing.” (76:2)
“He made all things good which He had created and He began the creation of man from clay. Then He made his (i.e. man’s) progeny from a quintessence of despised liquid, Then He fashioned him and breathed into him of His spirit; and He gave you hearing and sight and hearts.” See this verse (32:7-9)
“Thinketh man that he is to be left in vain? Was he not a drop fluid (sperm out of semen) which gushed forth? Thereafter he became ‘Alaqua’ (i.e. something that clings) And made of him a pair, the male and female. Has He not the power to bring back the dead to life.” (75:36-40)
“He it is Who created you from dust, then from a sperm drop then from something which clings then bringeth you forth as a child.” (40/67)
The beauty in the description of the above Qur’anic verses is that modern science could not add any such fact, which relates to the processing, of embryo in the womb and Qur’an does not mention the same.
Before we discuss the truth of these verses, it may be noted that the views of Aristotle (384-322CE) were predominant. He was of the view that actual creation and formation of the embryo was from the menstrual blood. To him the process resembled the curdling of milk into cheese.
The Qur’anic verse (76:2) as mentioned above ultimately proved Aristotle wrong. Explaining the word ‘Amshaj’ (mingled liquids), Ibn Kathir said, “Its root is from ‘Mashaja’ means to mix and ‘Masheej’ means (gamete) mixed with another. Ibn Abbas said, “It means the semen of the man and woman intermingled and then it passes through various stages. God said, “He created you in diverse stages.” (71:14)
However, Europe remained stuck to the unfounded notions of Aristotle, until 1668 when Redi dealt a blow to his theory. Pasteur in 1864 wrote the final obituary to the doctrine of spontaneous generation. In 1883 Van Banden proved that both male and female participated equally in the formation of human zygote.
Thus, what the Qur’an said was finally upheld by the scientists after about 1300 years of scientific ignorance regarding the creation of man.
The 20th century scientists have found that the Qur’anic verses are true and confirm to modern science after a long denial of about 1300 years.
It was impossible for a man living in the early 7th century to have expressed such facts, so it is absurd to say that Muhammad (peace be upon him) wrote the Qur’an. The science confirmed not only the truth of Allah’s Book the Qur’an; it also confirmed the prophethood of Muhammad (peace be upon him).

- Courtesy: thequranandscience.com


The beauty of prayer in Islam

Updated 23 September 2016
0

The beauty of prayer in Islam

GOING deeper into our spiritual state during prayers (salah) requires that we have a presence of heart and are mindful of the words being said during the prayers.
Our prayer will feel shorter, yet when we look at how much time we actually spent, we will think, “Did I just spend 10 minutes?” or even 15 and 20 minutes.
A person who began applying this said he wished the prayer would never end.
A feeling that Ibn Al-Qayyim describes as “what the competitors compete for… it is nourishment for the soul and the delight of the eyes,” and he also said, “If this feeling leaves the heart, it is as though it is a body with no soul.”

The love of Allah
Some people’s relationship with Allah is limited to following orders and leaving prohibitions, so that one does not enter hell. Of course, we must follow orders and leave prohibitions, but it needs to be done out of more than fear and hope; it should also be done out of love for Allah. Allah says in the Qur’an: “… Allah will bring forth [in place of them] a people He will love and who will love Him.” (Qur’an, 5:54)
We often find that when a lover meets the beloved, hearts are stirred and there is warmth in that meeting. Yet when we meet Allah, there is not even an ounce of this same feeling. Allah says in the Qur’an: “And (yet) among the people are those who take other than Allah as equals (to Him). They love them as they (should) love Allah. But those who believe are stronger in love for Allah.” (Qur’an, 2:165)
And those who believe are stronger in love for Allah. There should be a feeling of longing, and when we raise our hands to start the prayer, warmth and love should fill our hearts because we are now meeting with Allah. A dua of the Prophet (peace be upon him): “O Allah, I ask You for the longing to meet You” (An-Nisa’i, Al-Hakim)
Ibn Al-Qayyim says in his book Tareeq Al-Hijratain that Allah loves His Messengers and His believing servants, and they love Him and nothing is more beloved to them than Him. The love of one’s parents has a certain type of sweetness, as does the love of one’s children, but the love of Allah far supersedes any of that. The Prophet, peace be upon him, said: “Any person who combines these three qualities will experience the sweetness of faith: 1) that God and His messenger are dearer to him than anything else; 2) that his love of others is purely for God’s sake; and 3) that he hates to relapse into disbelief as much as he hates to be thrown in the fire.” (Bukhari)
Thus, the first thing he mentioned was: “… that God and His messenger are more beloved to him than anything else…”
Ibn Al-Qayyim says: “Since ‘there is nothing like unto Him’ (Qur’an, 42:11), there is nothing like experiencing love for Him.”
If you feel this love for Him, it will be a feeling so intense, so sweet, that you would wish the prayer would never ever end.
Do you truly want to feel this love? Then ask yourself: ‘why do you or should you love Allah?’
Know that you love people for one (or all, in varying degrees) of three reasons: For their beauty, because of their exalted character or/and because they have done good to you. And know that Allah combines all of these three to the utmost degree.

All-embracing beauty
We’ve all been touched by beauty. It is almost fitrah (natural disposition) to love what is beautiful. Ali ibn Abi Talib, may Allah be pleased with him, said about the Prophet, peace be upon him, that it was “as if the sun is shining from his face.” Jabir (may God be pleased with him) said: “The Messenger of Allah was more handsome, beautiful, and radiant than the full moon” (Tirmidhi)
Allah made all His Prophets have a certain beauty so that people would have a natural inclination toward them.
And beauty is more than what is in the face, because beauty is in all of creation and somehow has the ability to take our breath away and give us peace simultaneously. The glimmer of the crescent moon on a calm night, the intensity of a waterfall as the water drops for thousands of feet, the sunset by the sea … certain scenes of natural unspoiled beauty stirs something in us. As Allah is the One Who made it beautiful, so what of Allah’s beauty?
Ibn Al-Qayyim said: “And it is enough to realize Allah’s Beauty when we know that every internal and external beauty in this life and the next are created by Him, so what of the beauty of their Creator?”
This fitrah for loving what is beautiful is because Allah is beautiful. One of His Names is Al-Jameel (the Most Beautiful). Ibn Al-Qayyim states that the beauty of Allah is something that a person cannot imagine and only He knows it. There is nothing of it in creation save for glimpses.
Ibn Al-Qayyim says if all of creation were the most beautiful they could be (so let’s imagine, ever single human being looked as beautiful as Yusuf, peace be upon him, and the whole world was like Paradise), and all of them combined from the beginning of time until the Day of Judgment, they would not even be like a ray in comparison to the sun when compared to Allah. Allah’s beauty is so intense that we will not even be able to take it in this life. In the Qur’an, Allah describes Musa’s (peace be upon him) request: “And when Moses arrived at Our appointed time and his Lord spoke to him, he said, ‘My Lord, show me (Yourself) that I may look at You.’ (Allah) said: ‘You will not see Me but look at the mountain; if it should remain in place, then you will see Me.’ But when his Lord appeared to the mountain He rendered it level, and Moses fell unconscious.” (Qur’an, 7:143)
Even the mountain could not bear the beauty of Allah and crumbled, and when Musa, peace be upon him, saw this (he did not even see Allah), he fell unconscious. This is why on the Day of Judgment it is Allah’s light that will shine on everything. We talk about breathtaking beauty, but we have yet to experience Allah’s beauty. While things in this world can be beautiful or majestic or if they combine both they are finite, true majesty and beauty are for Allah: “And there will remain the Face of your Lord, Owner of Majesty and Honor.” (Qur’an, 55:27)
Keeping all of this in mind, the Prophet, peace be upon him, said: “Allah directs His Face toward the face of His servant who is praying, as long as he does not turn away” (Tirmidhi).
Remember this in your prayer, and ask Allah to allow you the joy of seeing Him in Paradise.