Qatar signs aid deal worth $1.25 billion for Morocco

Updated 28 December 2013
0

Qatar signs aid deal worth $1.25 billion for Morocco

RABAT: Qatar and Morocco have signed an aid deal worth $1.25 billion, part of a five-year package of financial assistance extended by Gulf states to the North African kingdom to help it weather ‘Arab Spring’ protests.
Four Gulf states — Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the UAE — agreed in 2012 to provide aid worth a total $5 billion to Morocco in the period 2012-2017 to build up its infrastructure, strengthen its economy and foster tourism.
Each of the four countries has committed $1.25 billion to Morocco for the whole five year period.
The aid is very welcome to King Mohamed — who signed the accord with the visiting emir of Qatar — as he seeks to quell social discontent.
Morocco is under heavy pressure from international lenders to reduce its budget deficit after spending heavily on food and energy subsidies and higher public sector salaries in 2011 and 2012 to help defuse social tensions.
Morocco has budgeted to receive a total $1 billion in aid from the Gulf states for 2014.
It hopes to cut its budget deficit to 4.9 percent of gross domestic product next year from an estimated 5.5 percent in 2013.
Qatar was the last of the four Gulf states to sign the aid accord with Morocco. It was not immediately clear whether Qatar would disburse the aid installments for both 2012 and 2013, each worth $250 million, together.
The Gulf states have agreed a similar package of aid, also worth a total $5 billion over a five-year period, for Jordan.


Abu Dhabi’s Senaat sees ‘potential’ for bond next year

An event was held on Sunday to mark the listing of the first tranche of Senaat’s sukuk on the Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange and London Stock Exchange. (WAM)
Updated 10 December 2018
0

Abu Dhabi’s Senaat sees ‘potential’ for bond next year

LONDON: Abu Dhabi’s Senaat sees potential to issue an additional bond next year, its CEO said on Sunday.

The state-owned investor in the industrial sector last month issued $300 million in sukuk, or Islamic bonds, according to reports. 

Jamal Al-Dhaheri, CEO of Senaat, said further bond issuances could be made next year. 

“Yes, there is potential (for 2019). We wanted to test the market and the response was very good,” Al-Dhaheri was quoted as saying by Reuters.

He was speaking at an event to mark the listing of the first tranche of Senaat’s sukuk, valued at $300 million, which is dually listed on the Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange and London Stock Exchange.

The sukuk was raised at a profit rate of 4.76 percent with a seven-year tenure, and saw demand from over 180 local and global investors, exceeding the coverage ratio by almost tenfold, state news agency WAM reported.

“The listing of the sukuk on the Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange is an important milestone in the company’s history. This is the first time the company has entered the public markets to issue sukuk that can be traded in one of the world’s leading financial markets,” Al-Dhaheri was quoted as saying.