Emirates Extrusion to invest AED13m for new production line

Updated 29 December 2013
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Emirates Extrusion to invest AED13m for new production line

Emirates Extrusion Factory (EEF), a leading aluminum extrusion company in the UAE and a subsidiary of Masharie LLC — the private equity arm of Dubai Investments (DI), has announced plans to add a new production line at its aluminum extrusion plant in Techno Park, Dubai, entailing an investment of AED13 million.
The new line, to be added by mid-2014, will further augment the production capacity to 6,000 metric tons and will go a long way in bolstering the company’s leadership in the sector.
This new line will boost the production of wooden finish and powder-coated aluminum, which augurs well for EEF amidst surging demand due to the construction boom in the region.
The company, which reported annual turnover of AED190 million in 2012, also unveiled plans to aggressively target the export markets in the wake of burgeoning construction activity across Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Yemen and Africa.
EEF currently exports nearly 60 percent to 70 percent of its production to various countries across the Middle East and Africa.
Khalfan Al-Suwaidi, EEF managing director, said: “The resurgence of the construction industry across the GCC and beyond is indeed good news for Emirates Extrusion, and we plan to cater to this inherent demand for extruded aluminum through our new production line.”
He said: “Construction takes a major chunk of our business — nearly 80 percent, with the rest being earmarked for industrial downstream projects.”
Al-Suwaidi said: “The new line will not only go a long way in escalating our overall output but also help us offer the most reliable aluminum profiles to the market.”
He said: “At EEF, we will continue to focus on exports in the medium to long-term, as there is a huge demand for our products in growing markets across the GCC, the Middle East, Levant and Africa. We also expect increased demand from the local UAE market following Dubai’s winning bid for Expo 2020, which reflects the immense growth potential on offer.”
According to Frost & Sullivan, a leading business research & consulting firm, the UAE aluminum extrusion market is estimated to be in excess of 175,000 metric tons (MT) which amounts to approximately 35 percent of the total Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) demand, growing at a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of eight to nine percent between 2011 and 17.
Since its establishment, EEF has grown to become one of the Middle East’s market leaders in the development, commercialization and production of high-quality aluminum systems for architectural and non-architectural applications.
The company offers an impressive range of premium-quality, energy-efficient extruded aluminum profiles. EEF offerings include windows, doors, and structural glazing, as well as partition grill, hand rail, and curtain wall systems.


UK’s Quercus pulls plug on $570 mln Iran solar plant as sanctions bite

Updated 14 August 2018
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UK’s Quercus pulls plug on $570 mln Iran solar plant as sanctions bite

  • Quercus said it will halt the construction of a 500 million euro ($570 million) solar power plant in Iran
  • Iran has been trying to increase the share of renewable-produced electricity in its energy mix

OSLO: A British renewable energy investor Quercus said it will halt the construction of a 500 million euro ($570 million) solar power plant in Iran due to recently imposed US sanctions on Tehran.
The solar plant in Iran would have been the first renewable energy investment outside Europe by Quercus and the world’s sixth largest, with a 600 megawatt (MW) capacity.
Iran has been trying to increase the share of renewable-produced electricity in its energy mix, partly due to air pollution and to meet international commitments, hoping to have about 5 gigawatt in renewables installed by 2022.
In June, before the US-imposed sanctions, more than 250 companies had signed agreements to add and sell power from about 4 gigawatt of new renewables in the country, which has only 602 MW installed, Iranian energy ministry data showed.
Washington reimposed sanctions last week after pulling out of a 2015 international deal aimed at curbing Iran’s nuclear program in return for an easing of economic sanctions.
US president Donald Trump has also threatened to penalize companies that continue to operate in Iran, which led banks and many companies around the world to scale back their dealings with Tehran.
“Following the US sanctions on Iran, we have decided to cease all activities in the country, including our 600 MW project. We will continue to monitor the situation closely,” Quercus chief executive Diego Biasi said in an email on Tuesday.
The firm will continue to monitor the situation closely, said Biasi, who declined to comment further.
Last year Quercus said it would set up a project company and sell shares via a private placement after attracting interest from private and institutional investors, including sovereign wealth funds.
Construction was expected to take three years, with each 100 MW standalone lot becoming operational and connecting to the grid every six months.

SANCTIONS BITE
Independently-owned Quercus has a portfolio of around 28 renewable energy plants and 235 MW of installed capacity.
The firm, founded by Biasi and Simone Borla in 2010, controls five investment funds and has a network of “highly regarded external partners,” it says on its website.
The 600 MW plant it aimed to construct in Iran would be the firm’s largest investment. Quercus declined to comment on the details of its decision to cease the plan and on any financial losses that could result from it.
Fearing the consequences of the US embargo, a string of European companies have recently announced they would scale back their business in Iran.
On Tuesday, German engineering group Bilfinger, said it did not plan to sign any new business in the country, while automotive supplier Duerr on Aug. 11 said it had halted activities in Iran.
Another project, planned by Norway’s Saga Energy, which said last October it aimed to build 2 GW of new solar energy capacity in Iran and to start construction by the end of 2018, has also stalled.
Saga Energy’s chief of operations Rune Haaland told Reuters it was still working on getting the funding, which is more complicated since recent developments, and although it aimed to push on with its plans, construction could be delayed. ($1 = 0.8773 euros)