Clint Eastwood saves man from choking

Updated 26 February 2014
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Clint Eastwood saves man from choking

WASHINGTON: Hollywood’s iconic good guy, Clint Eastwood, is also a real life hero after swooping to rescue a choking guest at a California reception.
“Clint saved my life,” Steve John told The Carmel Pine Cone, the local newspaper where the actor once served as mayor in the 1980s.
During a reception late Wednesday for a golf tournament in Carmel-by-the-Sea, John was eating and chatting, only to get a piece of cheese stuck in his windpipe.
“Suddenly, I couldn’t breathe. It was as bad as it could have been,” recalled the director of the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am golf tournament in California.
“Clint came up behind me, and he knew exactly what to do.”
The award-winning actor and director told the local paper that he saw in John “that look of panic people have when they see their life passing before their eyes.”
Eastwood, 83, moved behind John to perform the Heimlich maneuver.
“I gave him three good jolts, and that got it out,” the mega star recalled.
“And then I made him drink a big glass of water with a bunch of lemon squeezed in it.”
Eastwood, who most famously inhabited the role of “Dirty Harry,” confessed he’d never performed the Heimlich maneuver in real life before: “except to practice.”
The maneuver consists of standing behind a person and pressing strongly with both hands just above their navel to help expel any food or other object that is blocking the airway.


Chip Wickham ushers in winds of change on the jazz scene

Updated 22 May 2018
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Chip Wickham ushers in winds of change on the jazz scene

PARIS: The hotly hyped “British jazz invasion” has been the toast of international scenesters for some months now, with breathy adjective-heavy sprawls penned on both sides of the Atlantic paying tribute to a fresh generation of musos who grew up not in the conservatoires but the clubs, channelling the grit and groove of grime into a distinctly hip, 21st century strain of freewheeling, DIY improvised music.

Now the Arab world has its own outpost in the form of Chip Wickham, a UK-born flautist, saxophonist and producer whose second album grew out of extended stints teaching in the GCC. “Shamal Wind” takes its name from the Gulf’s primal weather patterns, and there’s a distinctly meditative, Middle Eastern vibe to the title track, a slow-burning, moody vamp, peppered with percussive trills, with hints of Yusef Lateef to be found in Wickham’s wandering woodwind musings.

There’s rather less goatee-stroking to be found across the four further up-tempo cuts, which swap soul-searching for soul-jazz, soaked in the breezy bop of a vintage Blue Note release. Recorded over a hot summer in Madrid, a heady Latin pulse drives first single, “Barrio 71” — championed by the likes of Craig Charles — with Spanish multi-percussionist David el Indio steaming up a block party beat framing Wickham’s gutsy workout on baritone sax.

Having previously worked with electronic acts, including Nightmares on Wax and Jimpster, one imagines the dancefloor was a key stimulus behind Wickham’s rhythmically dense, but harmonically spare compositional approach. Phil Wilkinson’s sheer, thumped piano chords drive the relentless nod of second single “Snake Eyes,” Wickham’s raspy flute floating somewhere overhead, readymade to be skimmed off for the anticipated remix market.

In truth, Manchester-raised Wickham is both too thoughtful, and too thoughtless, to truly belong to the London-brewed jazz invasion — Shamal Wind yo-yos between meditative meandering and soulful strutting with a wilful disrespect for trend.