King Carlos to hold talks with crown prince

Updated 17 May 2014
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King Carlos to hold talks with crown prince

Spanish King Juan Carlos is set to arrive in Jeddah on Saturday to hold talks with top Saudi officials, including Crown Prince Salman, minister of defense, and Prince Muqrin, second deputy premier.
According to Spanish Ambassador Joaquin Perez-Villanueva, the wide-ranging talks will focus on bilateral relations, as well as on regional and international developments.
Carlos’s delegation includes Defense Minister Pedro Morenes Eulate, Public Works Minister Ana Maria Pastor Julian, Industry, Energy and Tourism Minister Jose Manuel Soria and other senior Spanish officials, he said.
The Spanish monarch, whose entourage includes five ministers and a huge contingent of businessmen, will also meet with Interior Minister Prince Mohammed Bin Naif, said the envoy.
During his three-day visit to the Kingdom, Carlos will focus on how to boost political, commercial and cultural ties between the two nations.
Observers say the Spanish king’s current tour hopes “to draw Saudi and Gulf investment” to Spain as part of efforts to bolster the country’s moribund economy.
The busy agenda of King Carlos in Jeddah also includes a meeting with top functionaries of the Organization for Islamic Conference (OIC) and several business meetings.
Spain is a close ally of the Kingdom.
A Spanish-led consortium is currently developing a multibillion-dollar high-speed rail link between the holy cities of Makkah and Medinah.
Last week, Saudi Arabia also awarded a contract worth close to $1.7 billion to Spanish energy contractor Tecnicas Reunidas to build a large power complex in Jazan.
In a statement, Tecnicas Reunidas said it had been hired by Saudi Aramco, the state-owned oil company, to execute the Jazan IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) complex in the south western region of Saudi Arabia.


Saudi Arabia pledges $3bn to Pakistan, defers oil payments

Updated 24 October 2018
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Saudi Arabia pledges $3bn to Pakistan, defers oil payments

  • It was agreed Saudi Arabia will place a deposit of $3 billion for a period of one year as balance of payment support: statement
  • Pakistan is seeking foreign aid to help plug a massive budgetary gap which the Pakistan prime minister has blamed on the mismanagement of the previous administration

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has pledged $3 billion in support to Pakistan and allowed for deferred oil payments to help stave off a budget crisis.

The deal came as Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan attended the opening of the Future Investment Initiative (FII) in Riyadh on Tuesday.

Earlier Khan met with King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to discuss bilateral issues. It was his second visit to the Kingdom in just over a month.

“It was agreed Saudi Arabia will place a deposit of $3 billion for a period of one year as balance of payment support,” Pakistan’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

“It was also agreed that a one-year deferred payment facility for import of oil, up to $3 billion, will be provided by Saudi Arabia. This arrangement will be in place for three years, which will be reviewed thereafter.”

During his address to the gathering of global business executives, Khan also confirmed that Pakistan was in talks with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for a new bailout.

Pakistan is seeking foreign aid to help plug a massive budgetary gap which the Pakistan prime minister has blamed on the mismanagement of the previous administration. During his election campaign, the former cricketer vowed to create 10 million jobs and establish an “Islamic welfare state.”

After a consultative visit last month, the IMF had warned that Pakistan needed to quickly secure “significant external financing” to avert a crisis. 

Saudi Arabia and Pakistan have also discussed potential investment in mineral resources in Balochistan, the largest of Pakistan’s four provinces which borders Iran and Afghanistan.

Further discussions were held about a refinery project in Pakistan, the Finance Ministry said in the statement.

Pakistan’s external balance of payments represents one of the biggest challenges facing Khan.

The country’s current account deficit has ballooned as its central bank’s foreign reserves dropped to about $8.1 billion in October.

That was barely enough to meet the country’s sovereign borrowings between now and the end of the year.

The IMF expects Pakistan’s economic growth to slow to about 4 percent in 2019.

Pakistan is seeking to attract increased inward investment to help shore up its finances and Khan used the event as platform to talk about opportunities in sectors such as tourism, minerals, coal and gas exploration.

He also highlighted what he said were the successes of Pakistan in the fight against terrorism, which has brought peace and stability to the country, and pointed to the significance of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).

China has become an increasingly high-profile investor in Pakistan as Beijing pushes ahead with major projects such as the CPEC.