Zad designs for stylish, casual women

1 / 5
2 / 5
3 / 5
4 / 5
5 / 5
Updated 16 June 2014
0

Zad designs for stylish, casual women

Saudi fashion designer Zakia Attar aims to design stylish and affordable abayas and thobes for women who want to look good and feel comfortable. Her thobes and abayas are known to be a blend of cultural and modern styles characterized by a mix of trendy colors.
It all started when Attar was pregnant with her first child and was looking for Ramadan thobes to wear but couldn't find anything that suited her size or taste. This pushed her to shop for fabrics and design her own clothing, for which she later received several compliments from friends and family. This encouraged her to design more thobes, in addition to abayas, maxi dresses and maternity wear.
“The market lacked plus size clothing and maternity clothing that actually looked good. I was angry to see that bigger sizes were more expensive than small sizes and they didn’t look appealing to me,” she said. “When I started designing my own clothes, many people started asking me to do the same for them and that's when I decided to start my own fashion brand and call it Zad for Zakia Attar Designs,” she added.
Attar used to teach English aiming to inspire the younger generation to find themselves through language. “It was a passion and I was very happy to stand in front of a class and share my life experience and guide them to their next step in life,” she said. “I later quit teaching and focused on my home and while I was building it, I applied for an interior design diploma and that’s when I learned something about myself. I learned that I am always curious to learn more, especially when I’m in a place where I have to use my knowledge like designing my home,” she added.
Attar always had a passion for fashion. When she was a teenager she used to subscribe to fashion magazines and gather around with her friends to discuss latest trends. “I have always been attracted to street style because they are actually wearable and practical for everyone. I always admired those pieces that were lively and comfortable more that the glamorous ones,” she said. “You can actually see my love for street style in my designs now and my style for everyday designs and what I wear myself,” she added.
Fashion is personal and we all have individual styles, according to Attar. “Fashion to me is not about the image, it is all about how you feel wearing this piece of clothing and how you style it to suit your character,” she said. “My goal is to dress everyone and make them feel good in their own skin, all this in reasonable prices. But unfortunately, you sometimes have to hike up your prices in order to survive in the economy, in order to pay off all that comes with starting a fashion brand and to survive in this competitive market,” she added.
Zad started from being a home-based business to becoming a locally well-known brand, making its presence felt in the most famous malls in Jeddah. “It was a gift from my husband when he first rented the space for me to sell my designs as a way to show his support. By that time I was only designing one collection a year, which was a Ramadan collection. He did this to push me to do more and be more active with my designs,” said Attar. "It was very hard for me to design for a boutique because I do everything myself but this definitely pushed me to be more active and I couldn’t be more proud. I managed to produce 300 pieces in three months and it was horrifying but it really paid off,” she added.
Last year, a fire accident happened in the Red Sea mall where Zad boutique was situated and that changed everything. “The accident happened in the corridor where my shop was located. My husband and I were in shock because we invested so much in it and we were partners in this business who spent our time, money and energy to build it,” said Attar. “Surprisingly, I was calm and a firm believer that everything happens for a reason and at least we are all safe and no one was injured. We later relocated the boutique in the same mall and produced a whole new collection in only three weeks and everything went great and we love the new location, next to Saad Eldeen café,” she added.
Zad has just released its Ramadan collection comprising colorful designs and comfortable thobes and abayas. “I usually like to use soft and cool fabrics knowing we live in hot and humid weather. I use linens, cotton and viscose fabric. I like to design my collection with crochet and I guess that’s what I’m majorly known for,” said Attar. “I started my everyday collection for Ramadan using light fabrics for abayas and heavier ones for Eid. I have formal, semi-formal, casual and semi-casual abaya and thobe collections in store,” she added.

Email: [email protected]


Fashion capital New York considers banning sale of fur

Updated 17 April 2019
0

Fashion capital New York considers banning sale of fur

  • Lawmakers are pushing a measure that would ban the sale of all new fur products in the city
  • “Cruelty should not be confused with economic development,” a sponsor of the legislation said

NEW YORK: A burgeoning movement to outlaw fur is seeking to make its biggest statement yet in the fashion mecca of New York City.
Lawmakers are pushing a measure that would ban the sale of all new fur products in the city where such garments were once common and style-setters including Marilyn Monroe, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Joe Namath and Sean “Diddy” Combs have all rocked furs over the years.
A similar measure in the state Capitol in Albany would impose a statewide ban on the sale of any items made with farmed fur and ban the manufacture of products made from trapped fur.
Whether this is good or bad depends on which side of the pelt you’re on. Members of the fur industry say such bans could put 1,100 people out of a job in the city alone. Supporters dismiss that and emphasize that the wearing of fur is barbaric and inhumane.
“Cruelty should not be confused with economic development,” said state Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal, a Democrat from Manhattan, who is sponsoring the state legislation. “Fur relies on violence to innocent animals. That should be no one’s business.”
The fate of the proposals could be decided in the coming months, though supporters acknowledge New York City’s measure has a better chance of passage than the state legislation.
The fur trade is considered so important to New York’s development that two beavers adorn the city’s official seal, a reference to early Dutch and English settlers who traded in beaver pelts.
At the height of the fur business in the last century, New York City manufactured 80% of the fur coats made in the U.S, according to FUR NYC, a group representing 130 retailers and manufacturers in the city. The group says New York City remains the largest market for fur products in the country, with real fur still frequently used as trim on coats, jackets and other items.
If passed, New York would become the third major American city with such a ban, following San Francisco, where a ban takes effect this year, and Los Angeles, where a ban passed this year will take effect in 2021.
Elsewhere, Sao Paulo, Brazil, began its ban on the import and sale of fur in 2015. Fur farming was banned in the United Kingdom nearly 20 years ago, and last year London fashion week became the first major fashion event to go entirely fur-free.
Fur industry leaders warn that if the ban passes in New York, emboldened animal rights activists will want more.
“Everyone is watching this,” said Nancy Daigneault, vice president at the International Fur Federation, an industry group based in London. “If it starts here with fur, it’s going to go to wool, to leather, to meat.”
When asked what a fur ban would mean for him, Nick Pologeorgis was blunt: “I’m out of business.”
Pologeorgis’ father, who emigrated from Greece, started the fur design and sales business in the city’s “Fur District” nearly 60 years ago.
“My employees are nervous,” he said. “If you’re 55 or 50 and all you’ve trained to do is be a fur worker, what are you going to do?“
Supporters of the ban contend those employees could find jobs that don’t involve animal fur, noting that an increasing number of fashion designers and retailers now refuse to sell animal fur and that synthetic substitutes are every bit as convincing as the real thing.
They also argue that fur retailers and manufacturers represent just a small fraction of an estimated 180,000 people who work in the city’s fashion industry and that their skills can readily be transferred.
“There is a lot of room for job growth developing ethically and environmentally friendly materials,” said City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, who introduced the city measure.
New Yorkers asked about the ban this week came down on both sides, with some questioning if a law was really needed.
“It is a matter of personal choice. I don’t think it’s something that needs to be legislated,” said 44-year-old Janet Thompson. “There are lots of people wearing leather and suede and other animal hides out there. To pick on fur seems a little one-sided.”
Joshua Katcher, a Manhattan designer and author who has taught at the Parsons School of Design, says he believes the proposed bans reflect an increased desire to know where our products come from and for them to be ethical and sustainable.
“Fur is a relic,” he said.