Jubail port records 20% increase in cargo transport

Updated 11 July 2014
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Jubail port records 20% increase in cargo transport

Jubail Commercial Port has seen a 20 percent increase in the total weight of cargo transported via its port during the first half of 2014 with 5,075,054 tons compared to 4,244,648 tons during the same period in question.
Captain Fahd bin Ahmed Al-Amer, director general of Jubail Commercial Port, said that the total tonnage of liquid bulk cargo exports and imports amounted to 1,693,001 tons in the first six months since the beginning of the year compared to the same period last year when it was 1,132,343 tons, a 50 percent increase.
Meanwhile, the general cargo exports and imports declined by 38 percent where it scored 579,738 tons by the end of June this year compared to 927,645 tons in the first half of 2013, he noted.
Al-Amer said the number of containers (TEU) saw an increase of 26 percent for the first half of 2014 when it stood at 190,156 TEUs compared to 150,411 TEUs for the same period last in 2013.
According to him, a total number of 393 ships have docked at Jubail Commercial Port during the first half of 2014 compared to 322 ships for the first half of 2013, with 22 percent increase.
Al-Amer predicted that the increase will continue steadily during the current year due to the efforts of the port’s management in marketing and promoting the port to the private sector and via encouraging them to import and export via the port as well as the continuous development of the port’s services that are offered for customers in addition to improving the mechanisms of operation, which boosted the customers’ confidence in the port’s system.
“These achievements come as a result of the support given by the government of Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah to the ports’ sector and the direct and ongoing follow-up of Abdulaziz bin Muhammad Al-Tuwaijri, president of Saudi Ports Authority, to enhance the performance of the Saudi ports and develop them to compete with international ports,” he added.


Meet the Dubai ad men who pay you to sit in traffic

Updated 20 August 2018
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Meet the Dubai ad men who pay you to sit in traffic

  • Blockchain technology challenges traditional outdoor media
  • Adverts connect to driver mobile phone

LONDON: A new startup founded by UAE-based entrepreneurs is in the process of test-running a blockchain-based technology that could help people turn their cars into mobile advertising vehicles.
It could challenge the use of traditional advertising methods such as outdoor billboards, the founders of The Elo Network claim.
The platform — which has been set up by Mohammed Khammas and Mohammed Bafaqih and incorporated in the Cayman Islands — will enable people to be paid for displaying adverts on the side or back of their vehicles while they go about their daily routines of driving to work, the mall or doing the school run.
The adverts will feature low-frequency bluetooth ‘beacons’ that connect to the drivers' mobile phone which will be able to monitor when the driver is in the car and where the car is being driven.
There is a minimum threshold for the number of miles being driven a day, but the main prerequisite is that the driver is in the car. Drivers will still be paid even if stuck in a traffic jam.
Advertising clients will be able to put out requests that drivers head to a particular area — for instance to be close to a new brand launch — with drivers being paid up to 4 or 5 times more than their standard rate if they accept.
While the concept of paying people to use their cars for advertising is not new, it is the use of blockchain technology that will make The Elo Network particularly grounding-breaking in the advertising world, its founders said.
“Billboards are very expensive and static and don’t give you the KPIs and insightful information that brands want these days. You solve that by getting them that data,” Bafaqih said.
The Elo Network collates detailed data by tracking the movements of the drivers and their day-to-day activities. Data points such as a particular area’s population density can been collected.
The information will be encrypted ensuring that the brand will never know the identity of the driver, said Bafaqih.
“It creates data sets that didn’t exist before. You don’t have to worry about privacy but at the same time the brand can know about your patterns. They can know where you go in mornings, where you drive, what normal patterns are created in certain areas and countries,” he said.
This level of detail is increasingly important for brands looking to run targeted campaigns, and it is something that traditional billboards are unable to offer.
The technology will also be used to overcome the payment problems that other similar car advertising schemes have faced.
“Historically what happens, where there is a authority that is issuing payments, it causes a lot of problems. There can be disputes on how much they (the drivers) are owed or how many miles were driven or what campaign someone has done,” he said.
Under the Elo Network program, the blockchain technology allows you to create so-called “Smart Contracts” — which is a software protocol that enforces and verifies the performance of a contract.
“It says driver A is going to be paid — for example — a dollar per mile — so as the person drives he starts receives ‘IOUs’. Those IOUs are convertible at any time,” he said.
With no ‘middle man’ involved, the driver is able to redeem their IOUs and get paid as and when they want.
The network is currently at ‘proof of concept’ stage and is test-running the platform with a number of brands. It is anticipated that the network will be rolled out to the public toward the end of this year and early 2019.