ECRA: Power generation and transmission projects need SR526bn

Updated 11 July 2014
0

ECRA: Power generation and transmission projects need SR526bn

A whopping sum of SR 526 billion is needed for the implementation of power generation, transmission and distribution projects, local media said quoting a report released by the Electricity and Cogeneration Regulatory Authority (ECRA).
Based on a study on the estimated cost of electricity services during 1430-1441H, power generation will cost SR335 billion, or 63.7 percent of the overall costs, transmission SR121 billion (23 percent) and distribution SR70 billion (13.3 percent), the report said.
According to the estimates, the maximum power load will reach 71.940 GW by the year 1441 whereas the generating reserve will hit 15 percent, the report said.
In the fiscal year 1434-1435, a number of contracts were signed for the implementation of electric projects costing nearly SR 46 billion of which SR14.8 billion was allocated for generation projects, SR22.5 billion for transmission and SR8.5 billion for distribution projects, Al-Eqtisadiah daily said.
The volume of works and investments needed for electricity industry up to 1441 represents attractive opportunities to the private sector, according to the ECRA report.
The private sector companies could avail opportunities to implement independent projects for power generation, water desalination, construction, operation or lease of power transmission lines, management of current facilities, or provision of services to customers, the report added.
The report said ECRA pursues to select the best options in a manner to serve the interests of the Kingdom in coordination with the Ministry of Water and Electricity, the Saudi Electricity Company (SEC), Saline Water Conversion Corporation (SWCC) and other investors relevant to this area.


Oman ‘still needs expats,’ ministry says

Updated 20 min 57 sec ago
0

Oman ‘still needs expats,’ ministry says

  • The ministry said expat workers are needed because the country is working on “mega infrastructure projects”
  • Expats make up almost 90 percent of Oman’s private sector workforce, which the government has been trying to reduce

DUBAI: Driving down the number of expat workers in Oman’s private sector is “going to take a long time,” a senior official at the Ministry of Manpower said, highlighting infrastructure projects as areas where expat workers are needed.
Despite ongoing efforts to integrate more Omanis in the workforce, the ministry said the country still needs expat workers for “mega infrastructure projects.”
Expats make up almost 90 percent of Oman’s private sector workforce, which the government has been trying to reduce through its Omanization policies.
“Some professions in the private sector are Omanized and restricted to Omanis, such as administrative professions and some senior leadership positions, such as personnel managers and human resource managers. The Ministry of Manpower also issued a decision to ban the recruitment of a non-Omani labor force in some professions, as well introduced a hike in work permit fees for the expatriate labor force,” Salim bin Nasser Al Harami, Director General of Planning and Development at the Ministry of Manpower, told local daily Times of Oman.
The expatriate visa ban halted the hiring of expats to jobs across 87 sectors which include information systems, accounting and finance, sales and marketing, administration, human resources and insurance.
These efforts resulted in a two percent decline in October, which Al Hadrami said was a “a good and positive indicator.”
The National Center for Statistics & Information in Oman reported that of the 2,041,190 workers in the private sector, only 250,717 are Omanis, with the vast majority – 87.72 percent – being expatriates.
The Omanization drive aims to recruit more of local citizens in private companies — a similar push across the GCC where countries like Saudi Arabia and Kuwait who have also been trying to increase the number of nationals in private sector employment.